#1
So i am at that stage of playing after a year and a bit where i am right into the work of Yngwie Malmsteen and i was wondering, what can i learn so i can come closer to understanding what he does?

Today i printed off 12 sheets of sweep patterns, as in minor sweep patterns, diminished 7th patterns and some other things


What are some techniques or certain pieces that i can learn so that i can emulate a style similair to Yngwie's? also, any theory that i should pick up on would be cool too


Pretty much post anything you think could benifit me
#2
classical music and transcription. and theory.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#3
Learn theory.

Learn the notes on your fretboard, learn how intervals then learn how to stick intervals together to make scales - start with the major scale and learn how it's constructed and how to harmonise it.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#4
^ +1

As usual
Quote by dmtransmutation
What the Grunge-haters think is just mindless musical nonsense, in reality is the restoration of the old rule of harmony to not write an entire song in one tonality/key
#5
i agree with none of this.

Learn All the small things by Blink-182, learn the notes on the fretboard Tom uses. Start with the major scale Tom rips out in the break down and learn how it's constructed and how to harmonise it.
#7
Also, try to put on some weight. Fat fingers are the key to Yngwie's incredible speed

Oh, and you should learn how to swing your guitar around your back and sell all your guitar stands. Stands are for sissys, real men throw their axes onto a huge pile:

http://youtube.com/watch?v=rEvRDC-mGmg

/] 三方 [\
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
#8
Quote by steven seagull
Learn theory.

Learn the notes on your fretboard, learn how intervals then learn how to stick intervals together to make scales - start with the major scale and learn how it's constructed and how to harmonise it.



I think i can handle the major scale and it's formula at this point

I am looking for advice on how to develop a classic shred technique
#9
Learn the harmonic minor scale aswell.

And I've heard Mr. Malmsteen uses .8 gauges strings so yeah use them.
JUST ANOTHER ANNOYING BIG STATUS
#11
Well you could start by learning some of his songs. Also, learning classical, as in learning how to read music, get a book of famous solo classical guitar pieces, play them, analyse them theoretically in regards to chord progressions. Christopher Parkenings the art and technique of classical guitar books are good for teaching yourself how to read.

For the technical side of things, he uses alot of arpeggios in his playing, so economy and sweep picking will be important.

Really, your best way to get a hold of his playing is to see what kind of licks, runs, arpeggios he uses over what chords to get his sound. No cop outs here, it's all well and good to know his licks, but if you dont know where to use them, your just gonna sound like your randomly regurgitating yngwie licks out of context.
Quote by dmtransmutation
What the Grunge-haters think is just mindless musical nonsense, in reality is the restoration of the old rule of harmony to not write an entire song in one tonality/key
#12
Quote by ShredHead396
I think i can handle the major scale and it's formula at this point

I am looking for advice on how to develop a classic shred technique

That's not really what you asked though, I was responding to the question you asked in your OP.
So i am at that stage of playing after a year and a bit where i am right into the work of Yngwie Malmsteen and i was wondering, what can i learn so i can come closer to understanding what he does?

Given that you've posted in MT where people discuss music theory you're gonna get answers about theory - also the fact that you've printed off a load of patterns would understandably lead me to assume you don't know your theory well enough to make full use of sweeping.

if you've actually got a technique question you're better off posting in Guitar Techniques.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
Last edited by steven seagull at May 17, 2010,
#13
Quote by steven seagull
That's not really what you asked though, I was responding to the question you asked in your OP.

Given that you've posted in MT where people discuss music theory you're gonna get answers about theory - also the fact that you've printed off a load of patterns would understandably lead me to assume you don't know your theory well enough to make full use of sweeping.

if you've actually got a technique question you're better off posting in Guitar Techniques.



I was hoping to kill 2 birds with one stone here...

And i am not the most educated in musical theory, far from it

But i try steven, i try
#14
Well.... get a metronome and start learning how to use it. In addition to that, apart from learning how to alternate pick flawlessly (both left and right hands), learn additional techniques like sweep picking... economy picking only if you must (a la Frank Gambale)...

Then learn some... SOME... classical phrasing and composition... start listening to Ritchie Blackmore ( a big influence on Malmsteen and you'll find out why), also listen to Hendrix...

Then while this is going on prepare yourseelf for some Niccolo Paganini... ie: Go through his 24 caprices... and apply them in sweep picking format... also this is where you will stretch your alternate picking nightmare in very quick string cross picking.

A dvd from Berklee by Joe Stump will give you an idea of how to be an Yngwie copycat. Along with all the techniques mentioned. Malmsteen's instructionals are also very cool... if you learn to look past his flawless technique.

Now Hendrix was also a big influence on him... although there are many interviews where he either denies it or he embraces it (depending on the time of the month for the bitch that he is I guess). From this he learned feel... and Yngwie has one of the nicest vibrato's in the world... learn the simple things that are often overlooked in his style.

Then your next task would be to learn to write with all this neo-classical shit in your head, trying to apply it to pop. No jokes... apply it and find out (Teaser comes to mind, as do many others but that one will do).

And after many years have passed in you learning this stuff, yu are going to land up asking yourself a very important question.... one I will leave for when that time arrives

In the guitar techniques section of this forum you will find a couple of threads related to the techniques needed, as well as theory possibles in this section... I wish you luck and a pleasant journey... pack some food... its gonna be a long one
Last edited by evolucian at May 17, 2010,
#15
^ That was awesome, and suprisingly helpful


Could i ask for some more guys, i would really appreciate some more ideas on where to go, but that was pretty good evolucian
#16
You've only been playing a year, Leave the flashy stuff for now and concentrate on stuff like vibrato (malmsteen has the best vibrato ever). Study some baroque music in particular trio sonatas and pretty much naything by Bach.

Also check out Beethoven, Pagininni and Liszt. the latter two in particular.

You might want to start economy picking aswell. thats how his playing sounds so smooth. Although i do belive he alternate pickings descending runs.
Last edited by griffRG7321 at May 18, 2010,
#17
Quote by ShredHead396
So i am at that stage of playing after a year and a bit where i am right into the work of Yngwie Malmsteen and i was wondering, what can i learn so i can come closer to understanding what he does?

Today i printed off 12 sheets of sweep patterns, as in minor sweep patterns, diminished 7th patterns and some other things


What are some techniques or certain pieces that i can learn so that i can emulate a style similair to Yngwie's? also, any theory that i should pick up on would be cool too


Pretty much post anything you think could benifit me


You are simply learning how to function with arpeggios.

If you want to understand theory, start at the basics.
#18
Any chance you could upload the sweep patterns please?
Quote by MoogleRancha

You sir, are a genius.

I salute you.

Quote by iwontwait
The bestowing of this thread on my life is yours. Thank you, Benjabenja.
#19
Lock yourself in your room for the next ten years. You could start with that.
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#20
Quote by evolucian
And after many years have passed in you learning this stuff, yu are going to land up asking yourself a very important question.... one I will leave for when that time arrives

Why did I waste my time trying to sound like Malmsteen??
MARTY FRIEDMAN--"It’s a lot easier to be technical than it is stylized; it really is... But I think it’s a lot more rare to have someone who’s really got their own sound because that’s something you can’t practice."
#21
Quote by Benjabenja
Any chance you could upload the sweep patterns please?



When i get my music book tomorow, i'll get the URL for you
#23
That is a pretty foolish statement right there

How are you ever going to work it out if your not even going to bother learning them and playing them?

So just because you do not know how to do something a set way, you'll just not bother altogether?

For Shame Bro...
Last edited by ShredHead396 at May 20, 2010,
#24
Can I just make clear, first of all, I have no idea what you're trying to say.

You should be able to figure out logical arpeggio fingerings for sweeping if you're ready to start sweeping - a few examples are enough to prove the basic concept but after that you should be more than ready to figure it out yourself.

How are you ever going to work it out if your not even going to bother learning them and playing them?


What?

So just because you do not know how to do something a set way, you'll just not bother altogether?


What?


Regarding developing technique - I'd strongly suggest you work on your muting, timing and vibrato - at your current stage of guitar playing that's what lacking and what's most useful. (judging by the only vid on your YT atm, anyway).

I presume you've read the stickies in Guitar Techniques, which would be the logical thing to do if you wanted to develop excellent technique?
#25
Quote by ShredHead396
So just because you do not know how to do something a set way, you'll just not bother altogether?


basically what you're asking is "just because you don't know how to do something, you don't do it?" and, typically, that's the way the world works. if i don't know how to perform heart surgery, i don't do it. if i don't know how to serve a car, i don't do it. if i don't know how to install plumbing, ferment hops, or mix chemical solutions, then i don't. before i do them, i learn HOW to do them.

it's not about doing things "a set way", it's about doing them correctly. if you can't figure out sweep shapes for yourself, then you're just using someone else's knowledge and work in place of your own. you should learn from the knowledge of others - don't use it to excuse your lack of it.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#26
^ if that is indeed what he means, then if you don't know how arpeggios are formed and how to find them on the fretboard, you don't really know what you're doing if you sweep pick them - the former must precede the latter, or you're just a parrot - and as no-one with a clue would ever mistake a parrot for a human in conversation, no-one wants to listen to someone play out of key sweeps.

If that's what he means.
#27
Quote by ShredHead396
^ That was awesome, and suprisingly helpful


Could i ask for some more guys, i would really appreciate some more ideas on where to go, but that was pretty good evolucian

Thanks dude... but you really don't need more... What I mentioned in that post is a good 5 or 6 years worth of study...

When you have reached that point in time of playing experience... you will be far more than able to adjust to any style thereafter. Like I said... you don't need more... go through the suggestions, set yourself up a practice schedule that you can follow... and away you go.

Getting too much info will fry your brain...