#1
How do you guys proceed to learn new songs? Do you memorize each bar 1 at a time? or do you just try to play through it?

whenever i look up a song, ill look at the entire song and get discouraged from the length of it and how hard it looks. and then ill try to play it slowly, but then playing it slowly makes it hard because here i am plucking 1 note at a time with no sense of rhythm so there is no direction to what i am doing.

i really want to play more songs but i just don't know how to learn them.

any help please?
#2
look for patterns. depends on the song thought, after i learned that main riff or whatever it is all thats left is solos and transitions and it doesnt look as scary.
#3
Best way to learn a song, is to divide it up into the individual sections. And then once you learn all the parts, begin piecing them together. It's the most effective way for learning any piece of music.
I'm a musician/composer before I'm a guitar player.

foREVer


R.I.P Jimmy "The Reverend Tholomew Plague" Sullivan.
#4
Learn the form.

For example:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iPuOY3V22vo

Intro-Verse-Bridge-Chorus-Verse-Bridge-Chorus-Solo-Intro(same chords)-Chorus-Second half of Chorus repeated.

Now, instead of looking at the song like it's 11 different parts you can see that it's basically just an Intro, Verse, Bridge and Chorus, repeated.
So now instead of 11 different parts you need to learn, you've only got four, making the whole thing a lot less daunting. Then you just need to memorize which part to play when, which is simple enough if you know the song well.
Quote by dmtransmutation
What the Grunge-haters think is just mindless musical nonsense, in reality is the restoration of the old rule of harmony to not write an entire song in one tonality/key
#5
Yes, definitely look for patterns that repeat. At worst, the patterns will have a couple of notes added or removed. Check The Burning of Rome by Virgin Steele for example.
How to Program a Metalhead ?
#6
I agree with the above but also it is going to be hard when you start off (thats why so many people quit the guitar after a little while), but all it takes is repetition with the right technique to get a song down. I think you should start off with easier songs first so that you can get some of the basic techniques down ie. hammer ons and pull offs, and learn scales as well. This will give you a good platform for learning some of the harder solos.

peace,
Francis
#7
Quote by Count Orlok
Best way to learn a song, is to divide it up into the individual sections. And then once you learn all the parts, begin piecing them together. It's the most effective way for learning any piece of music.

this
I write songs in the same manner
#8
Yup, as has been said, chop the song up into pieces.

Even solo's can be cut up into fragments to make it easier to learn
"I'm not retreating, I'm initiating an offensive manouvre in the opposite direction!"
#9
I find it easier to import the song into GarageBand so that I can slow it down without affecting pitch, can set a loop to a specific number of bars and work from that. I've also done it with Quicktime on the PC or Windows Media Player, you can't set loops but you can change the speed of playback.
#10
Quote by Count Orlok
Best way to learn a song, is to divide it up into the individual sections. And then once you learn all the parts, begin piecing them together. It's the most effective way for learning any piece of music.

+1

Also a few other tips I use are to try and learn the entire song by ear then look up the tabs of the parts you can't figure out. And on solos download ASD http://www.ronimusic.com/amsldowin.htm

And if the song is difficult TAKE IT SLOW! This is something I never did until I actually realized how much easier it was. You will be surprised. There will be a riff that you absolutely can't get down but then you wake up the next day and surprisingly can play it. Happens to me all the time. But make sure it is a song you absolutely want to learn because if you start it you might get bored of learning it after a week and just give up, which wasted all that time when you could be learning a better song.