Poll: Who is/was the best Rock Keyboardist of all time
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View poll results: Who is/was the best Rock Keyboardist of all time
Jon Lord (Deep Purple)
18 14%
Manfred Mann
2 2%
Ray Manzarek (The Doors)
29 22%
Rick Wakeman (Yes)
17 13%
Dave Greefield (The Stranglers)
0 0%
Other, if other who?
63 49%
Voters: 129.
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#1
who is/was the best Keyboardist, Organist, Pianist of all time?
#3
Jordan Rudess.
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#6
Quote by Ninja Vampirate
Mozart?

Yeah, TS, if you're asking about rock pianists, then edit your post. If not, my vote changes to Chopin.
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#10
that guy off bill and ted.
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#15
Either Chopin, Schubert, Rachmaninov or Honegger for me.
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#16
franz liszt is known to have been the greatest piano virtuoso of all time. if we are putting the composition aspect into it though, its goes to chopin no doubt
#19
Rachmaninoff. If I remember rightly his hands could span a 13th. That's pretty impressive.
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#20
Best rock keyboardist IMO is Ray Manzarek, followed closely by Jon Lord and then Keith Emerson.

Matt Bellamy is very good as well in fairness. Freddie was only OK, really.

Classical favourite is Beethoven. 3rd Movement of Moonlight, come on!

Coming up fast behind is Chopin and then Rachmaninoff.
#21
Quote by entity0009
Rachmaninoff. If I remember rightly his hands could span a 13th. That's pretty impressive.

Jesus.

Any Bernie Worrel fans in the house?

Edit: And I'm gonna go ahead and say inb4 Geddy Lee.

We're looking at you, Fassa
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#22
Quote by TheBurningFish
Jesus.

I dunno, did they have pianos back in his day? >_>
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#24
Quote by entity0009
I dunno, did they have pianos back in his day? >_>

They may have. I'm almost certain there some reference to "Jesus, our Lord and clavier" in Sunday school.
The UG Awards exist only to instill me with existential doubt.


For me, the 60's ended that day in 1978...

Willies. Fuck the lick and fuck you too.
#25
Quote by TheBurningFish
They may have. I'm almost certain there some reference to "Jesus, our Lord and clavier" in Sunday school.



Let he who is without Cmin cast the first stone.

Okay, that sucked >_>
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#26
Quote by entity0009


Let he who is without Cmin cast the first stone.

Okay, that sucked >_>

Quite like Mary Mandolin.


>.>
The UG Awards exist only to instill me with existential doubt.


For me, the 60's ended that day in 1978...

Willies. Fuck the lick and fuck you too.
#28
TS, either you meant Best Ever in the Rock genre or your musical knowledge is severely gimped. There are several excellent Pianists in Jazz, for example. Thelonious Monk, Fats Waller, etc. Also, you completely forgot Mozart and Bach, both incredibly influential and talented masters of the keys. There's many others, in both the Classical and Jazz spheres.
Please go do some research and some listening; it will open up your musical eyes.

Edit: However, I'd have to say, due to his extensive classical background, that Jon Lords was the best of the choices you've listed off.
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at May 18, 2010,
#29
Franz Liszt, no question.

Some modern scholars believe he had some sort of bone disorder that actually allowed his hands to stretch and bend in ways that normal humans couldn't. There are certain Liszt pieces and passages that even modern virtuosos have to simplify to play.

EDIT: I did some quick Googling, and I couldn't find any evidence of Liszt's aforementioned bone disease. I may have been thinking of someone else, or just heard it somewhere and taken it as fact.

However, some of his music is too difficult for modern virtuosos.
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Last edited by Quintessence153 at May 18, 2010,
#32
Quote by Quintessence153
Franz Liszt, no question.

Some modern scholars believe he had some sort of bone disorder that actually allowed his hands to stretch and bend in ways that normal humans couldn't. There are certain Liszt pieces and passages that even modern virtuosos have to simplify to play.

EDIT: I did some quick Googling, and I couldn't find any evidence of Liszt's aforementioned bone disease. I may have been thinking of someone else, or just heard it somewhere and taken it as fact.

However, some of his music is too difficult for modern virtuosos.
They say Liszt didn't have webbing between his fingers and that's what allowed his hands to stretch.

Liszt was amazing for his time, but there have inarguably been pianists that could both write and play much more difficult material since Liszt. Charles Valentin-Alkan was actually around at Liszt's time period and his music is more difficult than Liszt's (and I personally like it more). Liszt actually saw him perform and stated Alkan had the most perfect technique he'd ever seen. Alkan wrote a piece called "Le Chemin De Fer" which even though is considered to be a weak composition is still difficult as shit and very few recordings have been made.

Here's the recording (I think it's done by a computer, and 3:45 is the most difficult part and the climax):

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/07/Le_chemin_de_fer_-_Alkan.ogg

And some sheet music excerpts:







My vote goes to Marc Andre Hamelin because he plays many pieces all by these composers that have wrote music way more difficult than Liszt, such as Alkan, Sorabji, etc. and his interpretations are usually well-received.
Last edited by The Madcap at May 18, 2010,
#33
my favourite out of those is jon lord. he just always seemed to know exactly what to play within the context of deep purple, something which lots of keys players seem to have trouble with. rick wakeman is also sick, but for different reasons. seeing him this summer

EDIT: out of that poll, i meant. as for completely open, duno. but probs still jon lord in a popular context, in a classical context liszt i guess....
Last edited by korinaflyingv at May 18, 2010,
#35
i just think its great that chopin came out with those etudes and everyone said they were the hardest things to play and liszt was not letting that happened so he came out with his own etudes that were harder that chopins
#36
I find the lack of Richard Wright in this thread disturbing, the man was way more important for Pink Floyds music than you might think.

Also, Craig Potter is a genius.
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#38
Either Bach or Chopin.


And TS you forgot Harpsichordists!
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#40
find the lack of Richard Wright in this thread disturbing, the man was way more important for Pink Floyds music than you might think.


A-men. He may not be the "best", but he is my favorite anyway. He adds more to Pink Floyd then any other rock pianist adds to their band, including the doors, IMO.

Although, yes, jazz and classical is where you will find the "best" pianists. Co-incidently Richard Wright was very jazzy, as was all of pink floyd.
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