#1
I am a huge fan of the blues and improvisation, and i enjoy learning theory and really enjoy learning scales. I can figure out the diatonic and pentatonic scales in all 12 keys in about 5 or less seconds. I also know the 5 positions for each. What is next? Can someone pleae describe the theory behind modes. I dont get modes at all. What other important scales should i learn?

Also is it important to learn what notes are in each scales?
Last edited by Bfrederi at May 18, 2010,
#2
You seem to know your scales in theory, but can you apply them? Make music with them? Because that's the point of scales, you know.
#3
You should know what notes are in each scale and know what they sound like without playing them. That is difficult and takes time though.
As for modes, your basically playing the same scale just starting and ending on different notes. For example, in C major, Dorian mode (being the second mode) would start on the second note of the scale, which is D, and ends on the D an octave higher. That is an extremely basic way of explaining it but its more or less what it is. Hope this helps!
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#4
Quote by Bfrederi
Also is it important to learn what notes are in each scales?


if you don't, then you don't really know the scales.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#5
Quote by AeolianWolf
if you don't, then you don't really know the scales.

+1

And when you "know" how to play a scale the next step is to learn how to use it, ie make music.
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#6
Quote by AeolianWolf
if you don't, then you don't really know the scales.


I'm not sure this is really fair. I probably couldn't list of the notes in say, D melodic minor as quick as could list the first seven letters of the alphabet, but I know the intervallic pattern and could work it out in a matter of seconds.
My name is Tom, feel free to use it.
#7
Quote by Bfrederi
I am a huge fan of the blues and improvisation, and i enjoy learning theory and really enjoy learning scales. I can figure out the diatonic and pentatonic scales in all 12 keys in about 5 or less seconds. I also know the 5 positions for each. What is next? Can someone pleae describe the theory behind modes. I dont get modes at all. What other important scales should i learn?

Also is it important to learn what notes are in each scales?


is it important to you..thats the question..do you WANT to know...

as far as what it next...learn songs...melody .... learn some easy melodic things...jingle bells...happy bday...london bridge etc...work them into you scales...learn them in all keys and octaves...and learn how to vary the melody..change the rhythm of it so it "kind of sounds like"...and then redefine the melody so it does sound like the song...

develop your ear..if you watch TV...learn & play the commercial jingles...they are usually easy and catchy...

do this for a few months and your playing will take on a new dimension

this will be the building blocks for advanced melodic stuff...

learn some blues progressions inside and out...they are the basis of alot of music today...

i would let modes wait a bit until you really have diatonic harmony under your fingers...

play well

wolf
#8
Quote by Prophet of Page
I'm not sure this is really fair. I probably couldn't list of the notes in say, D melodic minor as quick as could list the first seven letters of the alphabet, but I know the intervallic pattern and could work it out in a matter of seconds.

That's still different than just memorizing scale patterns.
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#9
Quote by hockeyplayer168
That's still different than just memorizing scale patterns.


I agree that you shouldn't just memorise scale patterns, but I don't think being able to recite every note in every scale from every possible root is necessary, that's all I was saying.
My name is Tom, feel free to use it.
#10
Congrats you know two scales out of 1000's.

Buy a scale book? I mean if thats yer thing to learn scales a book might help.
Last edited by Stuntaxe at May 18, 2010,
#11
Quote by Prophet of Page
I agree that you shouldn't just memorise scale patterns, but I don't think being able to recite every note in every scale from every possible root is necessary, that's all I was saying.


well, i think you should be able to do it, but i really don't think it's necessary either. if i ask you to recite a certain scale, and you do it, then you'll earn my praise; but what then? although you can recite the alphabet, that doesn't mean you can necessarily spell.

that said, to be serious, it is crucial to know every note in every scale (and, obviously, where they lie on the fretboard). like i said in an earlier thread, there's nothing wrong with knowing the patterns, but there's everything wrong with relying on them. if you must use patterns, that's fine -- but the key is to be conscious of the notes you're playing.
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#12
Quote by Stuntaxe
Congrats you know two scales out of 1000's.

Buy a scale book? I mean if thats yer thing to learn scales a book might help.
The problem with this is that learning hundreds of scales does practically nothing for you. You can get into very advanced melodic/harmonic concepts with simply a firm knowledge of the major scale and the three minor scales. After all, practically every applicable scale in western music relates directly to the major scale. A mastery of the major scale sets you miles ahead of "knowing" a thousand different scales.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
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#13
Quote by fretboard12
why should you not rely on patterns?

Because the patterns don't make music. You have to understand the function of each note of the scale in order to get much out of them.
wouldn't a combination of everything patterns, knowing intervals and so on be best?

Yes, that would be better than only relying on the patterns.
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#14
Quote by hockeyplayer168
Because the patterns don't make music. You have to understand the function of each note of the scale in order to get much out of them.

Yes, that would be better than only relying on the patterns.
Exactly.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
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#15
All of the things said above. Learn the three minor scales as well.

Modes are basically taking the notes of one scale but creating a different tonal center. So if I had the notes from the key of C but made it all resolve to F, then that would be an example of a mode (lydian in this case)

I would advise not getting into modes just yet unless you know the major scale and keys pretty well.

and be sure to apply all your knowledge that you have so far!
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