#1
Hey UG
Im new to writing and recording, and i know next to know theory as i am self taught over the last year/year and a half. Im trying to learn the way i enjoy, which is playing. However, today, i've been here writing a metal song that came to me (Intro so far). The main intro is in G Major, then the next part switches into G Harmonic Minor. Is this okay? I mean, it sound good to me, and i like it. I'll attach the Guitar Pro file for you all, as it is only done on this so far, could you check it out and give me some feedback please?
Thanks a million
Tom
Attachments:
metal.gp5
Gear:
Epiphone SG-400 (w/Hot Slags)/Chapman Guitars ML1 > Digitech Bad Monkey > Blackstar HT-5 > Danelectro Fish and Chips EQ > ETI Chorus Flanger
Snark Headstock tuner!
#2
If it sounds good, that's all there is too it. You can key change to whatever you want, whenever you want, as long as the outcome sounds good and is what you're looking for.

So, if it sounds good to you, then it's all good!
ProTone Pedals: Attack Overdrive
Fractal Audio: AxeFX 2
Engl: Fireball 60
Zilla: Fatboy 2x12
Carvin: DC700
Carvin: Vader 7
Schecter: KM-7 MKii
Schecter: Banshee 8 Passive
Jackson: DK2M
#3
First part isnt major. The use of b flat on guitar 2 makes it minor.
Check out my Tumblr
Quote by Victory2134
The world seemed like a better place when I didn't know what racism, genocide, and the internet was.
#4
Actually, the first riff is in Dmin (or G dorian). The second riff is in D phrygian. It's only a one note change, so that's great. And, as was said, as long as it sounds good to you, then it's right.


EDIT: In before someone comes and tells me it's not modal, like always. I'm not calling it modal, I'm simply referring to the mode shapes as a scale which is totally acceptable, and more common than actual modal music.
Last edited by Macabre_Turtle at May 18, 2010,
#5
Why concern yourself with theory? It's just theory.

Theoretically speaking though what you have done is fine. The idea of theory is just that... It's an idea. Keep that in mind.

9 times out of 10 if something sounds right it will be conducive to theory and that 1 time its not conducive to theory, some one will stand up and explain how it does conform to music theory while others will simply discredit what you made and call it shit because it does not follow theory. I am going to expect theory Nazi's to decend on this thread soon.


Stick with what sounds good to you and listen to what people think of the sound combo or series of notes. Whether it applies to theory or not does not matter, what does matter is what you think of it and whether or not the audience embrace it as good artistic expression.

Anyways good luck.
Last edited by Stuntaxe at May 18, 2010,
#6
the entire thing is in D minor. the only true accidental here is the Eb in the second part.

Quote by Stuntaxe
9 times out of 10 if something sounds right it will be conducive to theory and that 1 time its not conducive to theory, some one will stand up and explain how it does conform to music theory while others will simply discredit what you made and call it shit because it does not follow theory.


anyone who discredits music because it doesn't follow theory simply doesn't know enough. if you know theory -- and i mean know it extremely well -- you can make an astounding composition that will make it seem as if you know no theory. naturally, the same thing can be done without theory knowledge, but with much greater effort (mostly trial and error compositional process).
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.