#1
Hey,

So I've gotten myself to the point where I know the major scale in different shapes and can find my way around quite well. My problem now is that I have issues starting from other note sets besides the basic "box" so to speak. would this just be a matter of playing with it more often, such as jamming on a certain scale and things like that? Also would branching out to other scales like the harmonic minor and others help wrap my head around finding my way around?

Thanks
#2
no, this would be a matter of learning theory and understanding the major scale. once you really get it, you won't even need patterns.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#3
learning it the theory way takes a lot longer as it involves learning each note on the fretboard and remembering which notes are in each scale, while it's very useful it takes much longer.

Look up the CAGED system. It lays out all 5 basic patterns of the scales, pentatonics, and arpeggios.
#4
well i don't necessarily see it in shapes anymore, my biggest issue is more that i don't know where i am half the time. LIke i can hear what i'm playing just i don't know what i am doing.
#5
Even though I teach guitar on the weekend - and teach theory, let me ask you this. Do you need to be a car mechanic to drive a car? No. Do you need theory to play guitar? Do you need theory to be able to play scales? No. The vast majority of rock stars don't know one bit of theory, yet they can play better than the rest of us.

Now, let me go the other direction a bit. Theory helps us learn the "hows and whys" of music. It also allows us to speak and communicate with others who know it.

So, memorize the scales and practice them. Don't be afraid to pick up a little theory, but realize it's not absolutely necessary to learning scales, or playing guitar.
#6
so just memorize where all the notes are and leave it up to my ear like i've been doing?
#7
Knowing your scale shapes/patterns and a little bit of theory(difference in major and minor, and intervals) should take you a long way with this.
#8
Quote by njm0830
so just memorize where all the notes are and leave it up to my ear like i've been doing?


There's absolutely nothing wrong with leaving it up to your ear. Even though I know a decent amount of music theory, I play guitar almost entirely by ear.

You don't need any theory whatsoever to tell you IF something sounds good. But theory is very useful for telling you WHY something sounds good.
#9
Even though I've learned a lot of the scale patterns, when I play, most of the time I'm not thinking in patterns. This is how most experienced guitar players play. Starting off, you're going to need to think in patterns - there's no way around. Oh, you can play by ear, but it may be better to start off with the patterns. Learn your patterns and practice the heck out them. Gradually, as you practice these patterns and play them, you'll memorize them and find that you are able to move around the neck much easier. At that point, the entire neck is open for business and you're mixing patterns and largely playing by ear.
#10
Purely from the standpoint of developing your playing technique, scale patterns are incredibly helpful, if not necessary. You will become much more accustomed to different left and right hand coordination. They allow you to arrange the notes you want to play across the strings in the most efficient way, and with time, how to shape the tone of the notes you play.
My name is Tom, feel free to use it.
#11
Quote by KG6_Steven
Do you need to be a car mechanic to drive a car? No. Do you need theory to play guitar? Do you need theory to be able to play scales? No.


Quote by AeolianWolf
that's a ridiculous analogy. you don't need theory to play guitar, but it helps, since you actually know what you're doing. when you're writing music, you're making it, not using it -- so we're talking about building a car, not driving a car. you don't need to know theory to listen to music, and you don't need to be an auto mechanic to drive a car.

but i'd venture a wild guess: i'd think you'd want your car built by someone who knew what the hell they were doing.


yep.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#12
I think you should learn how major scales are made and how the other scales can be found by altering that. By all means, learn the patterns too but once you understand why or how these are made, it will be less like reciting a monologue you memorized and more like applying the knowledge that you have acquired.
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Who's going to stop you? The music police?
#13
Quote by njm0830
Hey,

So I've gotten myself to the point where I know the major scale in different shapes and can find my way around quite well. My problem now is that I have issues starting from other note sets besides the basic "box" so to speak. would this just be a matter of playing with it more often, such as jamming on a certain scale and things like that? Also would branching out to other scales like the harmonic minor and others help wrap my head around finding my way around?

Thanks


I know exactly where you are at. I teach a system that is not caged or box based which addresses these things you are asking about, and this is exactly why. Scales are finite, what would it be like to start anywhere and play everywhere, without boxes or cages?

It all really depends if you want to just play the guitar, or if you want to have understanding of what you are playing. Many people have the ability to function quite well on the guitar, with their licks and riffs, but very few truly know what they are doing or why it works (or doesn't). You have to decide which you want to be as a guitar player.

Best,

Sean