#2
well, if you apply what you hear, then of course.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#3
just listening wont do much for you except bring ideas to your head and liven up your creativity a bit. Practicing what you hear will improve your phrasing.
#5
it depends what kind of jazz. Listening to cool and modal jazz (particularly miles and bill evans) probably will. Listening to bebop or modern jazz may just inspire you to play long lines of 8th notes with a few cool syncopations.
#6
Quote by tehREALcaptain
it depends what kind of jazz. Listening to cool and modal jazz (particularly miles and bill evans) probably will. Listening to bebop or modern jazz may just inspire you to play long lines of 8th notes with a few cool syncopations.


you bought kind of blue so you're an expert now?

TS, don't listen to this schmo.

cop some bird licks. some clifford brown. some coleman hawkins. sidney bechet is excellent. lester young.
#DTWD
#7
It may not. A lot of pro Jazz players play around with phrasing a lot, and you might get lost unless you have a good foundation on phrasing.

I would suggest learning to play vocal melodies of some very memorable songs. Almost all phrasing is patterned on trying to repeat the expressiveness of the voice on your instrument, so I would start there.

Once you have a good idea about phrasing from that point of view, you could learn a lot from jazz musicians and how they play around with their phrasing.
#8
you bought kind of blue so you're an expert now?

TS, don't listen to this schmo.

cop some bird licks. some clifford brown. some coleman hawkins. sidney bechet is excellent. lester young.

that and hours listening to and practicing the music, and no, I am in no way an expert. When most people use the term 'phrasing' they are thinking of a more vocal sound with a conversational spacing between the notes. Listening and transcribing clifford brown (which is one of the main things I am practicing right now, for example) helps alot with playing fluid, connecting eight note lines and really getting a strong bebop sound with a lot of melody and flow in your playing (which I'm working on), but, if one is merely working on 'phrasing' I'd suggest the likes of miles, bill evans, grant green, cannonball adderly and more early players like louis armstrong, earl hines, django reinhardt and quite possibly charlie parker (though hes not really an 'early' player), as well as maybe some more modern players like christian scott, john scofield and matt stevens. But, if one is not too familiar with jazz and wants to listen to something to work with phrasing then Kind of Blue (which features miles, evans and cannonball) would be a great start, and I probably should have suggested that.
#9
I haven't been listening to jazz for long, but we have a great radio station in the Twin Cities that I pop on some times and I feel that my ears are getting much stronger from that listening.
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.