#1
I have a really stupid question about ear training: If you learn to hear the difference between augmented and diminished chords, the sound of inversions, and intervals (harmonically) Are you training yourself just to hear those things or are you improving your musical ear in general? Because it's not that important to hear the difference between augmented and diminished chords for example
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#2
Both. You are training your ear in general and getting familiar with individual intervals. But think about it, there's only 12 notes, therefore 11 intervals excluding unison & octave. Overtime you will learn to recognize each interval by ear. From there you can then identify chords by dissecting the intervals. In my opinion it's not too difficult to tell the difference between a diminished chord and an augmented one. The only similarity to the two share is how incredibly dissonant they are. They both have separate functions and are generally used at different scale degrees (augmented as a V chord, diminished as a 7th in major, or 2nd in minor). You can pinpoint the difference in where the tension is coming from either the b5 in diminished or the #5. If that's what's giving you trouble then you listen for the 3rd and determine whether it's major (augmented) or minor (diminished) just like you would in regular minor/major triads. In general you can hear how a diminished chord is flat and an augmented sharp - at least in comparison to the root.
#3
I think the differences are extremely important. At least to my ears. While both scales are atonal and symmetrical, its important to hear the how the major third intervals in the augmented scale make it sound uncomfortable and out of place while the minor third intervals in the diminished scale give it a more sad and almost sweet sound. I think these things are important to remember when trying to implement them in your songwriting.
#4
thats a pretty obvious difference?
the dim chord usually has a dominant quality while the augmented chord usually has a tonic function

that said yes it will definitely help your ear, because you train them to hear the difference in colors of harmony

i think at this point you should practise hearing the notes of the chord individually, thats a great earopener and makes stuff like this easy to hear
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#5
Quote by Funkicker
thats a pretty obvious difference?
the dim chord usually has a dominant quality while the augmented chord usually has a tonic function
Actually, augmented chords take on a very strong dominant quality as well.

In fact, both chords are unstable, symmetrical, and primarily take on dominant function. The only immediate difference is that augmented chords stack major thirds whereas diminished chords stack minor thirds.

That said, they occur at different places in scales. Diminished chords occur naturally on the 7th degree of the major scale and the 2nd degree of the natural/harmonic minor scale (and, using enharmonics, on the 4th and 6th degree of the harmonic minor scale) whereas augmented chords occur naturally on the 3rd degree of the harmonic minor scale (and, using enharmonics, on the 5th and 7th degree).

Someone check me on that to make sure I didn't make any errors.
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#6
Quote by food1010
[...]augmented chords occur naturally on the 3rd degree of the harmonic minor scale (and, using enharmonics, on the 5th and 7th degree).


that's the only error i see. i mean, understand why you might think that, since augmented chords divide the octave symmetrically, but if you were to force the chords on the 5th and 7th degrees to contain the same notes as the bIII+, you wouldn't be using thirds. you'd effectively just have inversions (since the 5th is a V and the 7th is a viiº.
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