#1
I've broken the low E twice in the past couple months (I've never broken any other strings) and I'm not 100% sure why.

I have had the strings on for a month, and I guess it could just be that, but I just play at random when I'm at home, and I wouldn't think that would be that long to have strings on, I probably had the previous set on for two months before the low E broke.
The set before that was on for about two months, maybe a bit more.

The ones I just had on were .009-.046, and were used in standard tuning, drop D, D standard and drop C. I don't have a second guitar so I change tuning fairly often. One thing I'm going to do when I buy new strings is get significantly bigger (I have set it up for larger strings before, these are the lightest I've used.) I'm thinking about .012 or something around there, since I'm often in at least D standard or a bit lower (sometimes as low as C standard.)

I'm just curious if this is fairly normal or what, cause I'm not really sure. I've only had an electric since last December, don't blame me for being a noob . Just a couple last things, it's an Ibanez GRX40, and the tremolo/bridge is a Strat-like Ibanez made bridge. Both times it has snapped right at the bridge. Also, sorry for long post
#2
Well, changing tuning very often can warp your neck. Especially the big drop from E standard to C standard. Or even just dropped D to dropped C. Still a whole step every string, different tension on the neck. Just saying.
#3
Check the saddle for sharp edges
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#4
Quote by TheAbsentOne
Well, changing tuning very often can warp your neck. Especially the big drop from E standard to C standard. Or even just dropped D to dropped C. Still a whole step every string, different tension on the neck. Just saying.


Yeah, I want a second guitar so I can avoid that but for now I've been keeping an eye on the neck and it doesn't seem to be warping, at least not yet. And I tend to try to avoid going quickly from E to C, I generally use a tuning in between for a bit.
#5
Correct me if I'm wrong, but it's probably because you go all the way down to Drop C / C Standard, then tune back upto standard. Which probably has a massive strain on the strings.
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#6
Quote by Mopy
Correct me if I'm wrong, but it's probably because you go all the way down to Drop C / C Standard, then tune back upto standard. Which probably has a massive strain on the strings.


It could be, but I don't really have any other choice for playing multiple tunings until I get a second guitar. (and a third one, and a fourth one, etc etc.)

If it seems normal to you guys, then I'll just live with it and keep buying new strings, I just didn't know if there was something I could change that would make them less likely to break. I checked the saddle, and considering where it's breaking, I don't think it's from a sharp edge on the bridge, as the part it's touching is rounded (kinda hard to explain in words.)
#7
Maybe if you originally tuned it to C or whatever then went to standard tuning the increased tension would make the strings more likely to break. Maybe it's just two random string breakages. Make sure you're stretching the strings each time you retune
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#8
Quote by Bendybaws
Maybe if you originally tuned it to C or whatever then went to standard tuning the increased tension would make the strings more likely to break. Maybe it's just two random string breakages. Make sure you're stretching the strings each time you retune


I have been, and it wasn't during retuning. I had actually had it in that tuning for a bit, and I was just playing and it snapped.
#9
You either need stronger strings or you are hitting the strings too hard. I was hitting my strings too hard and I used to break strings quite frequently. Now I've eased up and my strings last longer.

ron666
#10
I was going to say to tin your strings (Which is only done to unwound strings to prolong string life) but since its a Low E that's breaking check for burrs on the saddles and nut.

Quote by TheAbsentOne
Well, changing tuning very often can warp your neck. Especially the big drop from E standard to C standard. Or even just dropped D to dropped C. Still a whole step every string, different tension on the neck. Just saying.


You make it sound like a neck will really go crazy. If a person has a neck set to straight for normal tuning then tunes down to C it should back bow but that's normal for truss rod tension. Likewise if you set your neck to be straight for C Standard then go up to regular standard tuning the neck will then have relief. This is all normal for a neck.
Always tin your strings.

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#11
In my opinion having one guitar can help. It gets you used to how each one plays. I have to that I mainly use. Ibanez GRG and an Epiphone Les Paul Custom. I leave the Ibanez in standard because of the locking trem which takes me what seems like years to retune, while i use the epi for everything else. There are main reasons for strings to break. 1, quick detune (which you claim not to do) 2, really bad strings (we all get a duff batch at times) 3, sweaty hands (I personally have this issue but they dont break that quickly. What happens is the strings dull up and become weak (gradually) but if you dry your hands before playing or wipe the neck of the guitar while playing it should do the trick).
#12
i would invest in new saddles, if it's breaking at the string contact point.

less expensive then buying new strings over and over.
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