#1
Forgive me if I'm using the wrong term, what I'd like to ask is playing a chord progression by two guitars. How do I actually do that in a band situation? Let's just say a chord progression of Am-C-G-Em, what can the other guitarist play besides the same progression? I've checked out this http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/for_beginners/harmonizing_melodies.html and tried it but then they doesn't seem to blend in together.
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#2
You could try playing two different versions of the same chord. That's probably your best bet.

Either that or you start using polychords and chord substitutions- and something tells me you're not ready for that kind of thing yet.
#3
Quote by chainsawguitar
You could try playing two different versions of the same chord. That's probably your best bet.

Either that or you start using polychords and chord substitutions- and something tells me you're not ready for that kind of thing yet.

Actually, what I've done is playing a different chord, but then I'd like to add more spice to it.
MY GEAR
Ibanez SA160QM
Laney HCM10
Squier Bullet Strat
MXR Carbon Copy
Zoom Tri Metal
Modtone Flanger(mini)
EHX LPB-1
Korg Pitchblack
Timtone acoustic
Last edited by Broken-pick at May 19, 2010,
#4
Those Chords are all in the key of C Major. Other chords you can try to add and/or superimpose that would sound "right" include: D minor (Dorian) , F major (Lydian), and Bm7b5 (Locrian). Notice that this comprises a chord scale for C major and the patterns for the chords show you the notes on the fretboard.
Hope this helps! :P
#5
I would go a different spot on te neck or inversion, alternatloivy cross rhythms, arpeggios, or in some cases even the best thing is...NOTHING!!!!! Yep, knowing when the song don't need you is an invalubale skill!
#6
luisifer is right. adding chords that aren't in key will just clash. on the other hand, inversions will sound great. varying the rhythm on one of the guitar parts would really "spice it up." Adding a chord molody would work pretty well too. listen to guns n roses circa appetite-use your illusions. izzy stradlin and slash were the best team in terms of playing something that was "the same but different."
#7
Well you could have each person play a separate chord. I have a excel sheet that I made which shows the resulting intervals for such situations.

However that's really complicated and impractical. How about you have your friend play A E and B and then you play A C and G. That makes an Am9. Repeat for the rest of the chords.
i don't know why i feel so dry
#9
Quote by Broken-pick
Forgive me if I'm using the wrong term, what I'd like to ask is playing a chord progression by two guitars. How do I actually do that in a band situation? Let's just say a chord progression of Am-C-G-Em, what can the other guitarist play besides the same progression? I've checked out this http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/for_beginners/harmonizing_melodies.html and tried it but then they doesn't seem to blend in together.


Chord extensions, implying more harmonies. I teach for example, two guitarists how to play 2 different chords, making a larger chord in the process, such as a major 9th, etc.

Keep in mind this is through private instruction. One prerequisite is the ability to write out or memorize or instantly name the three notes in any triad, the full understanding of all keys, major scales, and how extended chords work in a diatonic key, all of which I taught them as well.

But if you know how to do all this then, you can do the same thing. You dont even have to strum the same chords, one can strum and the other arpeggiate, for example, pulling out the upper harmonies. Makes for some rather sophisticated stuff possible that most self taught guys will never be able to fathom or touch.

Best,

Sean
#10
Quote by Eastwinn
Well you could have each person play a separate chord. I have a excel sheet that I made which shows the resulting intervals for such situations.

However that's really complicated and impractical. How about you have your friend play A E and B and then you play A C and G. That makes an Am9. Repeat for the rest of the chords.

I don't quite understand this? My friend plays A E B and I play A C G? Single notes or chords? How do I apply such method?
MY GEAR
Ibanez SA160QM
Laney HCM10
Squier Bullet Strat
MXR Carbon Copy
Zoom Tri Metal
Modtone Flanger(mini)
EHX LPB-1
Korg Pitchblack
Timtone acoustic