#1
So I fixed up an old guitar of mine a while ago, it's an old bc rich warlock (flame shield). The thing, I'm very pleased with how it looks, it's easily the most comfortable guitar I've ever played, but I sort of skipped on costs for electronics and put some pretty poor P-90's in it, more out of curiousity than anything else.

Anyway, as a result, it sounds like ass, so I got to thinking, would putting active pickups into it make a difference in the poor tone? I'm basically after the tone like in "one" by Metallica (was thinking of an emg 81/85 set). Currently playing through an epi valve junion that's been modded, plus with a sweet od pedal, overdrive / distortion isn't a question.

So I suppose the main question I have is:
Will putting active pickups in my guitar make it sound like what I'm after, or will the generally poor tonal characteristics of the guitar wood still shine through?
#2
Actives will probably make the most of your guitar. The newer EMG 81TWX and the 89X would be a better choice or maybe Seymour Duncan blackouts.
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#3
Your guitar will sound exactly the same as in One, since hes using an 81. When you have active pickups thats just how the guitars sound. A Strat with an EMG will sound the same as a Les Paul with an EMG.
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#4
Great, thanks a million! I was just worried about spending all that money for it to still sound weak and lifeless.
#6
Having good quality woods DO matter in a guitar.

However, you'll find that they have a dramatically lowered impact in a guitar with active pickups.
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#7
Quote by Burgery
A Strat with an EMG will sound the same as a Les Paul with an EMG.


No.
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#8
Quote by Yngwi3
No.


+1

Wood does make a difference...and there are countless other variables. Two les pauls with the same pickups will sound different...let alone a strat and les paul.

In addition...you can't slap a 81/60 combo in any guitar and expect to sound like Metallica. Your amp still plays a substantially larger role.
Last edited by eyebanez333 at May 19, 2010,
#9
Quote by Burgery
A Strat with an EMG will sound the same as a Les Paul with an EMG.

This is of course total bollocks.
Gilchrist custom
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Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
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Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#10
As an EMG user myself, there is quite a huge difference in tone amongst guitars....let's take 3 guitars I've played with EMG's - An 89' Les Paul classic with an 81/85 set, a Fender Prodigy with 2 SA's and an 81 in the bridge, and my beloved 96' Jag-Stang with an SA and an 81...

The Prodigy sounded the thinnest due to the longer scale, heavier bridge mass (Kahler Spyder), and medium-dense body wood (Alder). Sure the gain structure sounds closest to the Jag-Stang, but it has a higher end closer to the Les Paul, however, the midrange was much more focused on the upper mids, giving the guitar that bright Fender with Floyd type attack sound.

Now, I'll compare this with the Les Paul. The Les Paul had beefier low end, more pronounced center mids, but still had a bright top end by virtue of a maple top, also, at high gain, the distortion became a little smoother due to the short scale (at least, that's my assessment). Still keeps it's top end due to the body wood and hardware mass.

Lastly is the Jag-Stang, which has a very rich and full low end, and a bright sparkly top, and more accentuated low-mids, with little or no mid-mids or high-mids, giving the guitar almost a naturally scooped tone with minimal effort, this usually requires me cranking up the mids dial on my amp to cut through the mix more. Much of the Mustang-like plinkiness of the bridge is gone due to the compression the pickups give, giving it a slightly more conventional sound, though the typical Fender Jaguar/Mustang/Duo-Sonic/Musicmaster 24" Scale "tchak"-like attack sound is still there, it just leads to a more sustained note.

Given what I know about Warlocks, their construction, it'd probably sound between the Jag-Stang and the Les Paul, probably a little cleaner and tighter in the neck than the LP, but a bit more punch and center middle range frequencies than the Jag-Stang, also the Floyd Rose might give a harder attack to the sound and a bit more sustain than the Jag-Stang, but maybe a hair less than the Les Paul, especially if it's a floating unit due to the lack of tight contact with the body.
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#12
Quote by Burgery
Your guitar will sound exactly the same as in One, since hes using an 81. When you have active pickups thats just how the guitars sound. A Strat with an EMG will sound the same as a Les Paul with an EMG.

It'll sound similar.

Assuming it's plugged into the exact same amp, Eq'd exactly the same way.
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