#1
K, i know about modes and how to make them and how they're all linked back to the major Ionian scale. What i want to know is how to composers give the, say, minor feel when composing in, say, E minor. Is it a matter of starting on an e note, then following notes mianly in E Aeolian (passing notes, suspended notes included of course).
When i tihnk aobut it, if they were to start on another note, they would give it another feel, like the feel a phrygian mode gives. Can someone shed some light on this for me?
#2
It's more about the progression and the notes used, than what note you start on... For example I can start with the note B but still give a piece an E phrygian feel, by ONLY using notes of E phrygian and phrasing it so that it resolves to E.
#3
Contemporary people don't typically write in modes. If you want to play E minor and make it sound minor, you simply play the notes in the scale. The accidentals will account for themselves if you have the proper key signature (which in this case is only F#).

I'm not sure if you are trying to write in modes...but it's a very counter-productive way to go about songwriting.
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#4
The note you start on should have absolutely nothing to do with it. For example, if you play the notes of C major only starting on E, it won't be E phrygian unless there's something else to suggest E phrygian, such as the use of a pedal tone or vamp (pedaling an E, or having an Em/Em7(b9) drone or something along those lines).

Basically, it's less about the melody and more about the harmony around it. This is not absolutely correct, as tonality can be established very strongly through melodic techniques, but for the sake of your understanding, that is what I'm going to tell you.

For example, you could play a lick that goes C D E D C and it could be in either C major or A minor depending on the harmony. Over C Am G C, it would be C major, but over Am F E Am (or even Am F Em Am), it would be A minor.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#5
Quote by dragozan
K, i know about modes and how to make them and how they're all linked back to the major Ionian scale. What i want to know is how to composers give the, say, minor feel when composing in, say, E minor. Is it a matter of starting on an e note, then following notes mianly in E Aeolian (passing notes, suspended notes included of course).
When i tihnk aobut it, if they were to start on another note, they would give it another feel, like the feel a phrygian mode gives. Can someone shed some light on this for me?


It might just be a brain fart, but the bolded text suggests you don't really know about modes as they really are. Do you know them as patterns and different positions as the major scale, or do you know what they are and how they are used?
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


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#6
A lot of it is related to harmonization rather than melody. Of you harmonize a "major" melody with the minor chords from that scale, it will sound minor.

You can get it to sound even more minor by making the melody resolve to the root note of the "mode" whila you are getting the chord progression to resolve to the minor chord based off of that root.