#1
okay, i see people talking about 3rds and 5ths and such and i really don't know what people are talking about. i know about the circle of 5ths but i don't actually understand it completely. somebody give me some info about this because in all honesty i don't even know what to ask here.
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#3
thank you sir!
Quote by ultimatedaver
You know, I'm actually gonna sig that. Because it is so unbelievably true.
#4
Hm, I guess that answers your question.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#5
for anyone skimming who wants to know ...

the most basic element of music is the interval. at least western music. it plays a huge part of melody and harmony.

here's a C major scale:

C D E F G A B
1 2 3 4 5 6 7

the number below each letter indicates its note location or scale degree. this is what people mean by thirds or fifths.

so let's say you want to harmonize a guitar solo and be uber metalz. let's do it in thirds. diatonically (within the scale) the easiest way to say it is take the note and harmonize it by skipping a note and playing the next one.

C (skip D) E

if you play a C and an E together that's a major third. if you play a D note you want to harmonize skip the next note (E) and play the next, F. this is a minor third. you can count out half steps as a way of remembering which is minor or major, but the easiest way is to just memorize your major and minor triads.

chords are built by "stacking thirds." so if you're in the key of C, as written above, let's say you want to play an F chord (which is the fourth). start with F, the root. skip one (G) then play A. then skip one (B) and play C. thirds are always one note apart which is why chords usually line up neatly on the staff.

i'm drugged up and got off topic. if that doesn't help, explain and i will.
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