#1
What are the "staples" for different sounds regarding types of basses? I know this in terms of guitars...(strats--blues, jazz, rock, les pauls---same as strats plus metal and so on) I know many instruments cross into many genres but what types of bassses work for certain sounds? I have an OLP five string but I am looking to upgrade so I can use the olp as my backup during gigs. I play in a classic/modern rock cover group.
#2
^Agreed.

You can pretty much use any bass for any sound. Though I wouldn't reccomend using a Rickenbacker 4003 for slap. Obeythepenguin pretty much said it all, since most basses are based off of Fender P and J basses, which can do anything.
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#4
Quote by Nutter_101

Haha I never said you couldn't, I'm just not a fan of it. I think they just don't have enough low end for slap and too much high mids.
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Quote by dullsilver_mike
The resonant frequency of the clitoris is too low for the guitar players to take care of.


Quote by jackers1234
you sir, have just won for this statement. =D


Young Knees
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#5
There is no genre of music involving an electric bass that has not been completely nailed with both the Fender Precision and the Fender Jazz basses. There are many other fine basses out there, but there is a reason why most bassists find their way back to the Fenders (or never leave in the first place). You would be hard-pressed to find a professional bassist who didn't have at least one well-used Fender bass in his or her arsenal.

Ibanez has been extremely popular in Heavy Metal. They make a lot of basses with thin necks, loud pickups and a good on-board EQ. Rickenbacker has a brighter sound that lends itself to a lot of things, but is most often seen in rock genres. It is a bit aggressive-looking for mellow Jazz.

Music Man's basses were designed by Leo Fender as improvements on his original designs. They didn't improve them; rather, they modernized them. They are excellent basses in their own right.

There are plenty of custom and near-custom makers out there that create fantastic basses that can be and are used for everything. Your wallet is the only limit on such creations.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#6
In all honesty I think your amp and your settings will make a bigger difference on how you sound fits into any given genre. The basses themselves are iconically attributed to different styles but with enough tweaking should be able to handle anything.
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#7
Most tonality comes from your amp. Get the bass for looks, play-ability, feel, what ever but most tonality comes from the amp. I have a BC Rich Virgin and with my amp and an EQ pedal I can get a nice funky sound, or I can get a deep muddy tone.
#8
^I dont agree with you how you say you can change your tone from dark and muddy to bright and growly with just changing your technique. I do agree with you that changing your technique will change your tone but changing it from muddy to growly? Ide like to see you do it.
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#9
Quote by The1bassist06
^I dont agree with you how you say you can change your tone from dark and muddy to bright and growly with just changing your technique. I do agree with you that changing your technique will change your tone but changing it from muddy to growly? Ide like to see you do it.


2nded If you look at strictly finger style technique there's a lot you can do but tonality won't change that much...maybe a little more growl or smoothness or add in some clank but the most drastic change you can cause will be done through your EQ.

On original topic...I agree with just about everything that has been said as far as stereotypes are concerned but honestly I think you can do just about anything with whatever bass you want. Sure individual bass will have their own unique sound but if you can dial in that bass in the genre you want to play I say go for. I'm one of those types of people that doesn't believe music should be defined by any type stereotype.

Just remember when working to find "your tone" just really look at every variable in the equation. Look at your amp and it's EQ, look at your cab (speaker size, ported vs. sealed etc.), your technique and how you approach it, and everything on your bass (string types, onboard EQ etc.) It's like a jigsaw puzzle in which you get to choose the pieces.
#10
Quote by The1bassist06
^I dont agree with you how you say you can change your tone from dark and muddy to bright and growly with just changing your technique. I do agree with you that changing your technique will change your tone but changing it from muddy to growly? Ide like to see you do it.

I can pull that off, between your attack, personal touch, technique and position. There are tons of options, experiment and I can assure you can make that much of a transition.
#11
The only bass that can't fit into any genre is a broken bass.

Any bass can play anything. Some basses may be more suited to one style or another, but any bass should be able to cross genre lines and do just fine.
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