#1
I had the TV on, and just heard the expression "It's literally cold as ice!".

This got me thinking...

Water turns into ice at 32 degrees F (0 degrees C). Can ice be colder than 32 degrees? Or is it all just one stable frozen temperature? IF it is stable, can anything be colder than ice?

If this is a stupid question I'm sorry, I'm not a big science buff. Now that I've typed this thread, it's sounding more stupid to me.

Please don't flame too much, you might melt the ice.
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#2
well, yeah there are a lot of things colder than ice. But I honestly don't know if it's one stable temperature or not. I'm pretty sure it can get progressively colder until it sublimates maybe. I don't know I failed at science.
#5
Well, water can be liquid at any number of different temperatures between 0 and 100 degrees Celsius. So I'd imagine it could be solid for a range of different degrees- 0 being the warmest ice possible.

I didn't actually take any science in high school though, so I could be wrong.
#6
Yes. Ideally, you can get water down almost to absolute zero if one was to chill it enough. 32F is just where water goes from the liquid state to the solid state.
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#7
It can get colder than 32 F and many things are colder than ice.
#9
Quote by mcamp1230
Uhh dry ice is much colder


Brings up if we're basing 'cold as ice' on Carbon-dioxide based ice, or Water based ice..

Hmm, interesting.

But it can get colder than its freezing temp.
#11
Water turns into ice at 0 degrees Celsius.

If it goes below 0 degrees Celsius, it remains ice.

Therefore, ice can be colder than 0 degrees Celsius.
#12
Okay also, numbers are an idea. They can go as far as our minds can take them. Can temperatures go just as far as numbers do? In this case, infinite.

Both increasing and decreasing.
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#14
I think this question has been pretty well answered.

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#15
Quote by JayT44
Okay also, numbers are an idea. They can go as far as our minds can take them. Can temperatures go just as far as numbers do? In this case, infinite.

Both increasing and decreasing.

No. The coldest theoretical temperature is absolute zero, which is 0 degrees Kelvin, or -273.15 degrees Celsius. It's the point at which there is no movement of particles in an object.

Infinite positive temperature could be possible I guess. I dunno
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#16
Quote by JayT44
Okay also, numbers are an idea. They can go as far as our minds can take them. Can temperatures go just as far as numbers do? In this case, infinite.

Both increasing and decreasing.


Well, people say that absolute zero (-273 degrees C) is the lowest temperature possible.
#18
Quote by JayT44
Water turns into ice at 32 degrees F (0 degrees C). Can ice be colder than 32 degrees? Or is it all just one stable frozen temperature?
That's the transition temperature at normal atmospheric pressure, between solid and liquid. Ice can be heaps colder than that.

Same thing about the transition from liquid to vapor. 212F / 100C. Above that temperature, at normal atmospheric pressure, water is a gas, not a liquid. But the temperature of water in gaseous form can be much higher than that.
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#19
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No. The coldest theoretical temperature is absolute zero, which is 0 degrees Kelvin, or -273.15 degrees Celsius. It's the point at which there is no movement of particles in an object.

Yeah, that's right. I learned that before actually, it just never stuck.
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#20
Quote by JayT44
Okay also, numbers are an idea. They can go as far as our minds can take them. Can temperatures go just as far as numbers do? In this case, infinite.

Both increasing and decreasing.


There is a point at which there is no molecular movement, known as absolute zero. It's -273 C or 0 K. That's as low as temperatures go.
#21
There are all sorts of exceptions especially on different planets and moons not just laboratory experiments. Really just depends on the element and pressure. i.e. hydrogen can be ice or the freezing point is different at different elevations.