#1
So pretty much the title explains it all... I'm not asking HOW really, just asking for a bit of advice for when i do... So, any advice? xD Tips, suggestions, etc. Thanks!
sorry about the vague post lol.
#2
Study other peoples solo that play in the same genre.
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


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#3
Quote by skylerjames13
So pretty much the title explains it all... I'm not asking HOW really, just asking for a bit of advice for when i do... So, any advice? xD Tips, suggestions, etc. Thanks!
sorry about the vague post lol.


Id say start by playing on the downbeats, holding notes for multiple beats using bends and vibrato to get your notes worth out of them to start with. I'd say feel the beat, but don't lose track, concentrate on counting, it helps.

Just turn on that track and start improvising, cause thats what improvising means. Play what you feel, let fly man. Have fun. Just dont zone out the backing track, pay attention to it, follow it.
#4
it is a vague post.

Do you know what the backing is? Like the chords or something?

If you know the chords you can either figure out what scale/s to use over them or follow chord tones (notes in the chord).

Regardless of whether you find the scale or not, it's prob best to land on strong notes of the chord on the main beats...

Could you give us an example of the kind of backing you would use? Then we could tell you what we would do
#5
Vague indeed...if it is just a jam track in a particular style and you are trying to practice improvisation then you need to know a few licks in that style and the scales commonly used.
If your trying to practice songs then tell me...but I don't want to waste time typing advice you don't need.
MARTY FRIEDMAN--"It’s a lot easier to be technical than it is stylized; it really is... But I think it’s a lot more rare to have someone who’s really got their own sound because that’s something you can’t practice."
#6
Find out what key the solo is in.
Pick an appropriate scale.
Play some music with the notes of the scale.
Actually called Mark!

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#7
You can take the trial and error approach and see what happens, or you can take the pragmatic approach and use the above information; find out the key and then apply a scale that contains the relevent notes.

E.g. C major backing track of Cmaj, Gmaj, Dmin, Amin
Possible scales - C major pentatonic, D dorian, A minor, etc

As for WHAT you do, listen to a bunch of youtube jams or your favourite artists and see what they do for ideas.
Last edited by Calibos at May 20, 2010,
#8
Quote by Calibos
You can take the trial and error approach and see what happens, or you can take the pragmatic approach and use the above information; find out the key and then apply a scale that contains the relevent notes.

E.g. C major backing track of Cmaj, Gmaj, Dmin, Amin
Possible scales - C major pentatonic, D dorian, A minor, etc

As for WHAT you do, listen to a bunch of youtube jams or your favourite artists and see what they do for ideas.


[/despair]
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#10
Quote by Calibos
How have I offended you, master?

over C Major you are going to play a C scale.

D dorian does not make sense over C as it is a D scale. It would make sense over D minor progressions. As would A minor over A minor progressions.

Scales do not just describe notes, but a basis of how you use them.

edit:
also, I'm pretty sure the word 'pragmatic' implies he comes across these scales through some practical form. As in, he finds them himself on the guitar rather than looking up the theory... I might be wrong, though.
Last edited by mdwallin at May 20, 2010,
#11
Quote by mdwallin
over C Major you are going to play a C scale.

D dorian does not make sense over C as it is a D scale. It would make sense over D minor progressions. As would A minor over A minor progressions.

Scales do not just describe notes, but a basis of how you use them.


That and they are all the same notes. In the context of C major, they are all C major.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#13
Quote by Calibos
lol my bad

if you'd have waited a little longer we could have started a conversation on modes and said a heap a shit that only a few people on here seem to know about... That is generally what we do here in MT :P
#14
haha, mode discussion sounds tempting , but i'd rather not embarrass myself further with my poor grasp of scales and the english language. I have brought great shame to MT and will commit seppuku, all I need is a second to finish the job

Last edited by Calibos at May 20, 2010,
#16
learn your modes! it allows you to solo anywhere. study this concept and youll eventually get complete freedom to move around the guitar without much guess work
#17
my god it never ends does it?
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

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i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


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#18
There's a Marty Friedman instructional video knocking about the internet which helps on this.
Talking about playing the chord tones, using arpeggios in soloing, creating and resolving tension etc, all great things to use when improvising.

Also, if you can get hold of it, Guthrie Govan's "Creative Guitar: Cutting Edge Techniques" talks a lot about soloing and improvising, it goes from quite basic to very advanced, from simple one chord vamps to key changes, so it'll last you until you get better at it.

But when I first started playing to backing tracks and stuff I'd generally just like, for example if the progression was in E minor, I'd do some bluesy/rocky stuff using the pentatonic scale, not really bothering about what note I was playing.
Which did sound alright, but when you begin thinking about what notes sound good over what chord, what notes don't sound good but are great for adding tension, playing "outside" etc etc, you'll really start to shine.
#19
Play the music in your head. If you can't do that, you have some more practicing to do!
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#20
Alright, I'll make it a bit more explained xD
I'm playing over a hard rock backing track, in D minor
It starts off with a bass and drumintro, then maybe 45 sec. later, the guitar comes in with a rocknroll styled riff. and then it slows down for like 45 secs again, then repeats the same thing.
What I really want to know, is how do I find out what scales to use for it?
and how do i stay in beat with the song?
Thanks everyone else too for all the replies!
#21
Quote by skylerjames13
Alright, I'll make it a bit more explained xD
I'm playing over a hard rock backing track, in D minor
It starts off with a bass and drumintro, then maybe 45 sec. later, the guitar comes in with a rocknroll styled riff. and then it slows down for like 45 secs again, then repeats the same thing.
What I really want to know, is how do I find out what scales to use for it?
and how do i stay in beat with the song?
Thanks everyone else too for all the replies!

Well, if it is in D minor, you could use the D minor scale...
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#22
Quote by chris4355
learn your modes! it allows you to solo anywhere. study this concept and youll eventually get complete freedom to move around the guitar without much guess work


Those aren't modes, they're just different positions of the major scale. They just happen to have the same notes, but they are not the modes. You could think of the patterns that way, but just know that you aren't really playing modes.
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


"To know the truth of history is to realize its ultimate myth and its inevitable ambiguity." Everything is made up and the facts don't matter.


MUSIC THEORY LINK