#1
Hey,

I recently learned about Modes, and I think I have the basics down. Can you tell me if this is correct?
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Ionian, Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, Mixolydian, Aeolian, Locrian

Ionian is the first note in the Major Scale
Dorian is the second note in the Major Scale
Phrygian is the third note in the Major Scale
Lydian is the fourth note in the Major Scale
Mixolydian is the fifth note in the Major Scale
Aeolian is the sixth note in the Major Scale
Locrian is the seventh note in the Major Scale

In the Key of C:

Ionian: C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C (C is the root note)
Dorian: D, E, F, G, A, B, C, D (D is the root note)
Phrygian: E, F, G, A, B, C, D, E (E is the root note)
Lydian: F, G, A, B, C, D, E, F (F is the root note)
Mixolydian: G, A, B, C, D, E, F, G (G is the root note)
Aeolian: A, B, C, D, E, F, G, A (A is the root note)
Locrian: B, C, D, E, F, G, A, B, (B is the root note)


Am I on the right track?
Gear:
Epiphone Special II
Jackson King V
Traynor DG30D
Digitech Whammy Pedal
Boss DD-3 Delay
Boss Metalcore Distortion
Boss Phase Shifter
Dunlop Crybaby Wah
#3
All you said is right, but do you know what makes G Mixolydian different from B Locrian?
Or C Ionian different from C Major?

Obviously they all contain the same notes, but they are all totally different.

Also you should learn to work out modes in terms of intervals:

A Gmajor is:
G A B C D E F# G
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

G Mixolydian is:
G A B C D E F G
And in relation to the G Major scale:
1 2 3 4 5 6 b7 8

That'll be true for any Mixolydian mode from its parallel major scale. Obviously each mode has its own formula, so you should learn both ways of finding the notes in a mode, and be able to answer the first 2 questions I posted
#4
That looks like a good start, post above me looks good too.

Mentioning modes in MT is like mentioning Rush in the pit though...
Tick tock and waiting for the meteor
This clock is opening another door
#5
I'm learning about modes at the minute too and would say I have a similar level of knowledge as you.

What I can't understand is the actual purpose of them.
#6
Quote by LutRes
I'm learning about modes at the minute too and would say I have a similar level of knowledge as you.

What I can't understand is the actual purpose of them.


There isn't much purpose, there's much more useful things you could be learning.
#7
Tremolonator...You got it!

The next thing to learn is all of those are 'derivatives' of the C Major scale, as each of them are made with notes only contained in the common C Major scale (or A Natural Minor scale). If you understand that, then the next thing to learn is...the possible chords you can build for EACH of those scales. Here's a couple...

C Ionian - C, Cmaj7, Cmaj9, Cmaj11, Cmaj13, Csus4, Csus2, C6/9, C6, Cadd9
D Dorian - Dm, Dm7, Dm9, Dm11, Dm13
E Phrygian - Em, Em7, Esusb9
F Lydian - F, Fmaj7, Fmaj9, Fmaj7/#11, F6, F6/9, Fsus9, Fadd9
G Mixolydian - G, G7, G9, G11, G13, G6, G6/9, Gadd9, G7sus4, Gsus4
A Aeolian - Am, Am7, Am9, Am11, Amb13,
B Locrian - Bmb5, Bm7b5

Since each of those scale is created with nothing but the C Major scale, all of these chords are also create with the notes found in the C Major scale. So these chords make up "the chords in the Key of C Major".

If you see a number of these chords in a song, you can tell yourself "I'm in the Key of C Major".

It will be in your interested to learn as much or more about Major and Minor Keys than Modes. Reason being is that there's a lot of things such as "in Key", "out of Key", "borrowed chords", "Cadences", etc...will teach you about music that will go above and beyond as predetermined set of notes. IOW, you'll understand music, not basic logic.

Once you can get past that basic logic, the application of Modes will explode your playing wide open. To where if you don't understand those things, you'll be stuck in a scale or predetermined set of notes and will never fully comprehend how to play beyond them
Last edited by MikeDodge at May 20, 2010,
#8
Quote by LutRes

What I can't understand is the actual purpose of them.

when used properly they all have a very unique sound. dorian is often used in celtic music and old gregorian chants and has a very "light" or uplifting type of sound to it as example.
#9
Quote by LutRes
What I can't understand is the actual purpose of them.
Then you shouldn't bother learning them.

It seems that you (by not understanding their purpose) actually understand them better than a lot of others who actually misunderstand them and exaggerate their purpose in modern music, which is rather slim.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#11
Quote by griffRG7321
There isn't much purpose, there's much more useful things you could be learning.


While I agree with you completely. I think he needs to find out on his own how usefull/useless modes are. After he's figured them out and all the mystery is gone, he'll be able focus on tonal music without having "what about modes?" stuck in his head.

We all lead our own musical journey.
Quote by dmtransmutation
What the Grunge-haters think is just mindless musical nonsense, in reality is the restoration of the old rule of harmony to not write an entire song in one tonality/key