#1
After months of deliberation, I have finally ordered Paul Hindemith's The Craft of Musical Composition. Is anyone else familiar with the book? It features his theory of harmony, which is radically different than traditional harmony. He puts chords into six different categories, and doesn't distinguish between major and minor chords. I'm really looking forward to reading it.

But, anyway, how difficult is it?
#2
That sounds pretty damn strange, I'm intrigued.
Call me Batman.
#3
Quote by Holy Katana
After months of deliberation, I have finally ordered Paul Hindemith's The Craft of Musical Composition. Is anyone else familiar with the book? It features his theory of harmony, which is radically different than traditional harmony. He puts chords into six different categories, and doesn't distinguish between major and minor chords. I'm really looking forward to reading it.

But, anyway, how difficult is it?


This is one book I havent heard of - when you get it please post an overview here.

Best,

Sean
#4
Quote by Holy Katana
After months of deliberation, I have finally ordered Paul Hindemith's The Craft of Musical Composition. Is anyone else familiar with the book? It features his theory of harmony, which is radically different than traditional harmony. He puts chords into six different categories, and doesn't distinguish between major and minor chords. I'm really looking forward to reading it.

But, anyway, how difficult is it?


This is a common misconception about hindemith. He was one of the first pantonic composers, which means that he would modulate freely between all keys as he saw fit. This does not mean that he does not distinguish minor and major, but that whether the chord is minor or major is unimportant as long as it achieves the desired sound. But he still recognizes the difference between the two in his composing
#5
Seems interesting, although I have actually got around to reading it yet.

Book 1 seems pretty comprehensive, written in the same style as Pistons Harmony with some concepts explained in diagrams and charts. He also analyses a few compositions using the concepts (Dies irea and Tristan und Isolde are the ones I can remember without getting up and trying to find it).

Book 2 deals with the practical application of the concepts involved in book 1, in the form two part writing.
Last edited by MapOfYourHead at May 22, 2010,
#7
Never read it. Always found Hindemith a very dull composer. His Elementary Training for Musicians, and his harmony book are excellent, however. If you're interested in composition, look into this (if you can find a copy, I was lucky enough to pick one up in a charity shop) and this.
#8
As far as i've been reading the book, it seems very cool... don't quite know about his music being dull though. He is on a different plane of writing... interesting to tap into that frame of mind.
#9
Quote by National_Anthem
Never read it. Always found Hindemith a very dull composer. His Elementary Training for Musicians, and his harmony book are excellent, however. If you're interested in composition, look into this (if you can find a copy, I was lucky enough to pick one up in a charity shop) and this.


Interesting, is it just Messiaen's sort of theories covered in that first book? (modes of limited transposition etc) or is it more composition as a whole?

Same with the latter, 12 tone?
#10
Quote by griffRG7321
Interesting, is it just Messiaen's sort of theories covered in that first book? (modes of limited transposition etc) or is it more composition as a whole?

Yes, he talks about modes of limited transposition in that. Messiaen's treatise is pretty much focused on his style of composition, and symmetry, birdsong and modes of limited transposition all important themes. Messiaen also dabbled in serialism. Not sure if he covers it in that particular book, but he deals with it in one of his treatises.


Same with the latter, 12 tone?


Schoenberg was not just a serial/12 tone composer. He started out writing very romantic music, very much like Wagner on steroids. If you haven't heard Verklate Nacht, listen to it. It's beautiful.
He then went on to write very expressionistic music, in which he started his forays into atonality, or as he referred to it "pantonality". Pierrot Lunaire is a great example of his expressionistic style, it appears to be quite atonal, but if you really look closely, it's quite deeply rooted in tonality.
After that came his serial phase. He started out as a very strict serial composer in this period, and this is where his very austere, formulaic image comes from. He maintained that artistic expression was more important than adhering to rules.
He then went back to tonal writing, in the last stage of his life, making many arrangements of his earlier successes.

As a result, the book has a pretty wide scope.
#11
Quote by National_Anthem
Never read it. Always found Hindemith a very dull composer. His Elementary Training for Musicians, and his harmony book are excellent, however. If you're interested in composition, look into this (if you can find a copy, I was lucky enough to pick one up in a charity shop) and this.

I love Messiaen. Too bad the book's hard to find.

I got the book yesterday. I'll blog about it or something once I finish it.