#1
Alright, I'm going to give you a hypothetical situation, and I want you guys to tell me a solution for the problem that presents itself within the situation.


Alright, first let's address the rhythm section. The Drums are fairly standard, the snares are more "smack" than wirey or pulsey, and the Kick is subby. The toms have some mids to 'em, but they also occupy the space of the bass. The bass itself has no mids and alot of treble.

Now...to the Guitars...it's a Epiphone SG going into a ENGL Powerball with a scooped out EQ. The focus is on and the gains all the way up, and it's using the high gain channel. Even though the amp is scooped out, 2 EQ's and a compressor give it some more bottom and high-mids.

It should be noted here that this rhythm section can't be altered, it's not in my hands to do so, so anything involving altering is moot pretty much.

Now, we have a choice for 2 guitars to do the lead, the first question is...should I use a strat or a Les Paul, I can say from what I've tried so far, the LP sounds better in this situation, but the problem is, I can't seem to make the lead "fit" in the mix.

On it's own I can make lots of tones that I'm fond of, but none of them sit THAT well in the mix, scooping the lead makes it sit better, but the notes get lost amid the high gain rhythm when I do that.

I can only use amp sims for the tone, but I have Amplitube 3, Guitar Rig 4, Solo_C, Lepou 456, and TSEX30, so I SHOULD be able to get a decent tone AND have it fix in the mix, the problem is not in the tools but in my ignorance of how to handle the situation.


TL;DR Strat or Les Paul to go over an SG? How should I EQ the lead guitar to fit in a Scooped/High Mid mix?
#2
Plug a frequency analyzer on the track and see where there are holes to be filled, then see if any of those holes would lend themselves well to a lead guitar part.
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#3
As for just "sitting in the mix", you have to really look at the stereo field you're working with. Is it really in-your-face mixed, or quite far back/reverby? Where are the different freqencies panned? The lead part should match up to these, much like comleting a puzzle. A lot of it is trial and error, but based around what you have worked out so far, so theres really a limited amount you have to mess around with before you find something that works.
#4
Thanks guys! I've NEVER used a Frequency Analyzer but I've had one for years, you two have just solved me hella work.

The mix is in your face BTW, not as severely as I've heard by definitely not the far away/reverb sound.
#5
Quote by Sid McCall
Plug a frequency analyzer on the track and see where there are holes to be filled, then see if any of those holes would lend themselves well to a lead guitar part.

this is what i would do