#1
well, ive been having some problems lately. ive been taking on some more challenging pieces lately (challenging for me anyway), such as the Sor Etude in B minor.

the problem is, some of the phrases, particularly ones that include barres, i cant execute cleanly. i can be fretting with literally all the strength in my left hand, and ill still get buzzing notes.

i know that your first reaction to this is probably that you think im inexperienced and am trying to blame mistakes i make on my instrument. while it may be true that im a lot more experienced in other guitar styles, ive taken enough classical lessons to know that my technique is fairly solid. not perfect, but getting there.

also troubling is the fact that i can get through those phrases without trouble when im playing almost any other nylon string guitar, brand new ones at guitar shops or some of my freinds guitars.

so, do guitars just become less "playable" as they age? is there anything i can do to help the issue without getting a new instrument?
#2
Quote by RobinTrower12
If there's an issue with your guitar the best thing you can do is take it into a shop and try to get it fixed. Was it a high quality guitar to begin with? How old is it exactly? If it seems really unplayable and the tech guys at a music store can't do anything to fix it then maybe buying a new guitar is the only thing you can do.

the guitar is about 30 years old, and is definitely medium quality, it has good tone.

it isnt completely unplayable, just some imperfections come through when playing it.

i dont know if this is a good example, not very good recording quality, but heres what it sounds like.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X1tjTJJOor0
#3
You may benefit from a string change. What tension strings are currently on it? How is the fretboard relief? Check it by placing a capo at the first fret then fretting with your hand at the 12th. There should be just enough clearance under the high and low E strings at the 6th fret to slide in a credit card. If the strings are hitting the frets then the trouble may be that the neck needs a reset(not cheap). Most classical's don't use an adjustable truss rod, so if the relief is off there's not a lot that can be done apart from using different tension strings.
Another thought is humidification of the instrument. 30 yrs. is quite old. Has it been maintained with the proper humidity and temperature? Either of these can wreak havoc on an old guitar.
#4
Quote by LeftyDave
You may benefit from a string change. What tension strings are currently on it? How is the fretboard relief? Check it by placing a capo at the first fret then fretting with your hand at the 12th. There should be just enough clearance under the high and low E strings at the 6th fret to slide in a credit card. If the strings are hitting the frets then the trouble may be that the neck needs a reset(not cheap). Most classical's don't use an adjustable truss rod, so if the relief is off there's not a lot that can be done apart from using different tension strings.
Another thought is humidification of the instrument. 30 yrs. is quite old. Has it been maintained with the proper humidity and temperature? Either of these can wreak havoc on an old guitar.

i just came into possession of it about a year ago. i dont exactly know
#5
thegloaming, don't be too overly critical of yourself. Have a look at the attached video of Andres Segovia playing his classical and take special note of the periodic buzzing sounds. It's almost inevitable that this happens while playing a stringed instrument. Segovia was a master at his art and if he wasn't too concerned about it happening once in a while, then neither should you. I personally think it adds a lot of human element to the sound. If music is played so precisely that there are no mistakes it tends to become more robotic sounding and less personal. The scratch sound when sliding along the wound strings, the occasional buzz, a note not held for quite the required time all make for truly beautiful music to my ears. There's more emotion involved.

It's another matter of course if the guitar is at fault, which is why I suggested that you replace the strings and make sure the humidity and temperature environment is good for the guitar where it's stored. Shoot for 45-50% rH and about 70 degrees F at all times and the guitar will stay healthy. If you're seriously in doubt as to it's condition, bring it in to a reputable luthier/repair tech to have it gone over and inspected.

Here's the vid:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9efHwnFAkuA
Last edited by LeftyDave at May 23, 2010,
#6
I agree with LeftyDave, I thought your playing sounded fine. You sounded very smooth, under control and barely cacked out any notes at all. Just keep practicing!