#2
because that's where the sound comes from?

I'm confused by your question :S

EDIT ah ok, basically the cabinets aren't in themselves loud enough to cover the entire show, so they have to go through the main sound system as well
Last edited by tim_mop at May 22, 2010,
#3
um, cuz the amps noise comes fromm the cab and they need to mic it over the PA system so everyone can hear. kinda common sense yes?
#4
It depends on the mic, but a lot are directional (which is very important live)
If they werent pointed right at the cab, they would pick up other stuff too, so when the sound guy is mixing the tracks, there would be other instruments on the guitar tracks, and it would sound crappy.
#5
Basically the amps are on stage for the guitars to hear themselves. They are then mic'd to the venues bigger speakers to make its even louder.
I Like Deathcore, Deal With It!
#7
Quote by Grave Robber
Basically the amps are on stage for the guitars to hear themselves. They are then mic'd to the venues bigger speakers to make its even louder.


This. The mics are there to capture the tone from your rig, fed to the sound board, and mixed through the venues PA/sound system.
#8
it's not really "to make it louder". It's hard to explain.. It's only really necessary to mic up amps that are too quiet in small venues where the PA system only has 2 speakers at the front of the stage, and i think that's the only scenario where i'd consider miking up an amp only to add volume.

In larger venues such as the place i work, they tend to have rows of speakers throughout the room, because otherwise at the back if the place was packed all the people would absorb the sound by the time it's got to the back and you'd get a muddy sound back there. So they have several rows of PA speakers. Obviously, if they are gonna do that, they are also going to have to have all the sounds coming through the PA because if they don't mic up the guitar amps then they are going to get lost when the sound reaches the back of the room, and also, with some slight natural delays due to the way sound waves take time to travel though the air, if you haven't miked up a particular instrument, people at the back are only going to hear it as an echo which will sound a little bit out of time as well... (this is the reason in stadiums they have PA speakers with a calculated delay so the powered sound comes out of the speakers the same time the actual sound from the stage reaches you, otherwise you'd have a very very noticable echo).

It gets to the point where your amp's physical volume is only relevant for monitoring purposes - so you can hear yourself from your amp.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.