#1
Hey UG,
You can hardly call it real technique, but it's more a mental aspect of playing guitar, I found when I first started playing guitar. The easiest way to explain it is by telling a little story.

So, I have these chord exercises, I use to become familiar with new chords and one day a while ago, I was just shredding away changing between two or three chords. A good while later I remembered that I had to make sure I didn't hit the low and high e strings. So I looked down and saw that neither string was moving an inch but the very moment I became aware of it, I messed up the whole thing.

Bottomline is that when I think too much of what I am playing instead of letting the music flow naturally, I usually make more mistakes. I should mention that in most aspect in life, I am perfectionist, so it was really a mental barrier just to rely more on my instincts and muscle memory. ¨

I am interested to know if anyone else have had the same problem.

P.S. The title is inspired from the movie "The last samurai".
#3
I am the same way. I play best when I just let my fingers do their job and not worry about being perfect. If I try to play something perfectly, I screw up.
#4
Ive noticed this while practicing strumming patterns. I use a metronome to stay in time but I notice if I count at the same time, It turns out aweful and mess ups sortly follow. However if I just go with the clicks and dont think about counting then it sounds great.

Would keep it like this but something tells me that it is bad practice lol
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#5
I agree. Once I learn something, if I think about what I'm doing, I can't do it. I've spoken to quite a few guitarists who feel the same way.
#6
It is a problem for me - if I think too hard about what I'm playing I completely **** it up.
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#7
Same here,I can play somthing fine but when I start to count the number of beats I get lost in the thoughts and make a mistake,You should clear your head when playing.
#8
Quote by van01010100
Yes, not so much with guitar though but with golf I'm also a perfectionist.

Oh god I hate that. As soon as I think about my swing even slightly, I fuck it up majorly. Same goes with my guitar playing but not as badly.
#9
Honestly, I think it's all about balance. You can't say that you should never focus your mind on something intensely, otherwise you will never really learn the proper way to do things. And doing things the "proper" way is what it's all about for perfectionists. So at first, practicing slow, and REALLY paying attention to what your doing, is crucial. You probably need "too much mind" at this stage. And then later on, when you have the muscle memory down from the slow practice, then of course you don't have to think about it or mentally stress over it. But yeah, for me, it's about this balance.
#10
Quote by Sadokun
Ive noticed this while practicing strumming patterns. I use a metronome to stay in time but I notice if I count at the same time, It turns out aweful and mess ups sortly follow. However if I just go with the clicks and dont think about counting then it sounds great.

Would keep it like this but something tells me that it is bad practice lol


only problem with that is if your not counting your bound to lose track of well the count. Losing your place in the song and all. You've got the beat, and to be honest thats the hardest part, counting is pretty simple just crash and burn a few times. Counting is the only way I can keep the beat while playing anything halfway complex.