#1
When I say ridiculously high, I mean stuff like the D above high C without falsetto. I guess this means I'm straining? It takes a lot of energy to get that high and even though I can sustain it and I'm not feeling any tension in my throat I do get a sudden headache sometimes that lasts a few seconds when I try to sustain that high D.

Still haven't figured out how to blend in my head voice to hit those really high notes, is that the problem here?
#2
You might just be out of breath. Do you use your diaphragm? How often do you sing high notes? I know sometimes if I'm out of breath I start to get a little dizzy and get headache (happens mostly while singing high notes, because you need a lot of breath support). That might be your problem.
Last edited by Dregen at May 22, 2010,
#3
I have the same problem. But I only started singing this year. I don't run out of breath though.
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#4
Quote by LazyLatinoRocke
I have the same problem. But I only started singing this year. I don't run out of breath though.


It's not really literally running out of breath, but just not getting enough breath over a period of time. Which is why if I sing a lot of high stuff then I start to get a little lightheaded after awhile. I don't know how to explain it.
Last edited by Dregen at May 22, 2010,
#5
Don't think I'm running out of breath, and yeah I'm singing from the diaphragm (never known any other way)
this is only on the very top-most notes, maybe just the C# and the D which as a guy maybe I shouldn't be singing =D

weird thing is these last for less than 5 seconds, which has never happened with a headache for me before
maybe there's some weird muscle at the top of my head I'm somehow straining? is that even possible when you're singing?
Last edited by Cheeseman07 at May 22, 2010,
#6
Quote by Cheeseman07
When I say ridiculously high, I mean stuff like the D above high C without falsetto. I guess this means I'm straining? It takes a lot of energy to get that high and even though I can sustain it and I'm not feeling any tension in my throat I do get a sudden headache sometimes that lasts a few seconds when I try to sustain that high D.

Still haven't figured out how to blend in my head voice to hit those really high notes, is that the problem here?


Yeah, that's absolutely the problem. You're probably overloading your cords with tons of air, too.

Think about it this way. It's like trying to walk really, really fast. Eventually you're gonna want to switch to jogging or running, because the motion is way more economical for the speed you're going. If you try to push your legs to move super fast to walk at running speed, it gets tiring very quickly, and you're probably going to strain yourself. You might be able to get quite fast, but your body probably won't like it, and it's really inelegant looking.

That's kind of what pulling your chest voice is like. You aren't giving your mechanism a chance to switch to a more economical configuration, so you might be able to hold it for a bit, but you're using a ridiculous amount of effort, and it's going to sound inelegant, loud, and painful.

My advice? Stop using so much air. You don't need to be as loud as you think. If you watch a lot of really good pop or rock singers hitting high notes, their mouths really aren't that far from the microphone. They know how to get volume through projection, not through increased airflow. If you're using more effort to hit a note than you would to hum the note, you're doing something inefficiently.
#7
Quote by Chaingarden
*post*


Huh. I guess I learned something today. Gonna have to put more work into finding a more relaxed upper range.