#1
anyone ever thought about or accually switched instruments due to lack of demand on your current? i am a folk musician who is well...an Acoustic Guitarist and well...when ever im trying to get a group going it seems everyone...EVERYONE! is a guitarist, and im tired of being just another guitarist sooo....i got some money coming my way and i think im going to invest in a decent Mandolin & an Octave Mandolin or Bouzouki.

ya hardly ever see anyone posting "Mandolin Player looking etc" but i always see people looking for a mandolin player etc.

sound lame? or a good idea? i do love the sound of the mandolin family so its not a sacrifice, but more of just something different to work at...

until then i guess i'll be workin the 12 string like mad to prepare for those insane doubled strings of the mandolins...
#2
i think it's a great idea, i have the same problem on a regular basis but it's usually me not having a decent bassist... or singer for that matter ahaha
Saw Things So Much Clearer, Once You Were In My Rearviewmirror.

Well I've Been Down So God Damn Long, That It Looks Like Up To Me

SG man for life!
#3
this was actually the exact reason i started on bass guitar as my first instrument instead of guitar. You're always looking for a bassist or drummer for your band, but never a guitarist - everybody's a guitarist these days
Ibanez RGT6EXFX -> Ibanez TS9 -> Korg Pitchblack -> Peavey 5150 II head -> Mesa Rectifier 2x12 cab
#4
I see nothing wrong with switching to being a bit of a mandolin player. All it's going to do is give you a wider range of skills, making you more desirable to more groups.

I can say from experience that it really shouldn't be too hard to get used to the double strings on the mandolin. I play one here and there, never had a major issue switching back and forth between mandolin and guitar. The one thing you've got to remember is that the strings are tuned differently. A mandolin is tuned the same as a violin, if I remember correctly.

Anyway, I think its a good idea! Nothing wrong with expanding your horizons!
"Here I sit, beneath a lonely line."

~iband48's signature
#6
Quote by iband48
I see nothing wrong with switching to being a bit of a mandolin player. All it's going to do is give you a wider range of skills, making you more desirable to more groups.

I can say from experience that it really shouldn't be too hard to get used to the double strings on the mandolin. I play one here and there, never had a major issue switching back and forth between mandolin and guitar. The one thing you've got to remember is that the strings are tuned differently. A mandolin is tuned the same as a violin, if I remember correctly.

Anyway, I think its a good idea! Nothing wrong with expanding your horizons!



thanks for the advice. im kinda used to the doubled strings already with the 12 string, i end up playing that more anyways, usually have it tuned down a whole step though because 12 strings have some vendetta against acoustic bridges i hear.

bagpipes lol...
Last edited by WaltTheWerewolf at May 23, 2010,
#7
Seems like a fine idea to me. Being able to play more instruments is always to your benefit imo. I'm only passable on guitar but I play bass and drums as well and it's helpful from time to time when a song calls for a different format or something...

But yeah. Guitarists are a dime-a-dozen in any genre. Even good guitarists with livable personalities aren't that difficult to come by; other instruments often have more demand. Banjo might be another good option if you're spreading out into the world of folk strings.
#8
Quote by ColbyHink
'didgeridoo beatboxer looking for serious project.'


haha, i think you'd struggle there making people believe you're serious
Saw Things So Much Clearer, Once You Were In My Rearviewmirror.

Well I've Been Down So God Damn Long, That It Looks Like Up To Me

SG man for life!
#9
Quote by Eskil Rask
this was actually the exact reason i started on bass guitar as my first instrument instead of guitar. You're always looking for a bassist or drummer for your band, but never a guitarist - everybody's a guitarist these days

But you can always use another guitarist!!
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#10
Quote by WaltTheWerewolf
anyone ever thought about or accually switched instruments due to lack of demand on your current? i am a folk musician who is well...an Acoustic Guitarist and well...when ever im trying to get a group going it seems everyone...EVERYONE! is a guitarist, and im tired of being just another guitarist sooo....i got some money coming my way and i think im going to invest in a decent Mandolin & an Octave Mandolin or Bouzouki.

ya hardly ever see anyone posting "Mandolin Player looking etc" but i always see people looking for a mandolin player etc.

sound lame? or a good idea? i do love the sound of the mandolin family so its not a sacrifice, but more of just something different to work at...

until then i guess i'll be workin the 12 string like mad to prepare for those insane doubled strings of the mandolins...


I choose an instrument to play based on how much I like its sound and/or music played on that instrument.

To pick an instrument strictly for the purpose of being "different" is kinda silly IMO. I mean you're still you. It's not going to make YOU any more original/unique.

playing a "different" or exotic instrument might make you feel cool for awhile though, and people might even tell you that it's cool. If you don't truly love the act of playing it though, the novelty will surely fade..... along with any other superficial benefits you may have gotten.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at May 23, 2010,
#11
I think it's good to learn as many instruments as you can. As you've said there's a lot of guitarists around but not many, people proficient on other instruments in comparison.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#12
i quit guitar after 8 years and became a bass player. i made $45 last night playing bass. $50 for one gig the week prior. $70 for two gigs a week before that. and i have at least two gigs per week coming up in the next month and a half. it pays to play an instrument that people don't care about.

it worked out well though because i haven't been this drawn to an instrument before. the closest was when i first started playing guitar, but this has lasted for over a year now. it's almost become an obsession.

i know a guy through a mutual friend that makes his entire living playing lute/theorbo for various things. the theorbo is kick ass by the way:

#DTWD
#13
I've always wanted to play the Theremin, but I don't know where to find one :/

I wouldn't have use for a Mandolin player in a band I would be in, honestly. All the non-guitar/bass/drum/vocals/keyboard instruments would be recorded before hand.

It would definitely be interesting to see what a Mandolin player could bring to a Prog Metal band though!
#14
prog metal isn't where the money is though. how many times do prog metal bands play coffee shops? weddings? bourbon/irish/bluegrass/general/baroque/renaissance festivals? plenty of bluegrass bands at fairs and conventions. have yet to see a prog metal band at one.

my point is that our respective pop-rock or prog metal bands are just fun hobbies. even though you have no use for a mandolin player, in the scope of music as a whole he's going to get a lot more bang for his buck.

to TS: in addition to what i said earlier, make sure mandolin is right for you. go play one for a while in a store. maybe grab a mandolin book off the shelf and go to wherever the mandos are and start playing some stuff. i got one and have played it a few times for various gigs. i was listening to lots of grisman and stuff like this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GA0Ht1DDMRQ

but it turned out mando just wasn't really my thing.
#DTWD
#15
Quote by primusfan
prog metal isn't where the money is though. how many times do prog metal bands play coffee shops? weddings? bourbon/irish/bluegrass/general/baroque/renaissance festivals? plenty of bluegrass bands at fairs and conventions. have yet to see a prog metal band at one.

my point is that our respective pop-rock or prog metal bands are just fun hobbies. even though you have no use for a mandolin player, in the scope of music as a whole he's going to get a lot more bang for his buck.

Hobby is exactly what it is for me ;]
#16
Quote by DiminishedFifth
I've always wanted to play the Theremin, but I don't know where to find one :/

I wouldn't have use for a Mandolin player in a band I would be in, honestly. All the non-guitar/bass/drum/vocals/keyboard instruments would be recorded before hand.

It would definitely be interesting to see what a Mandolin player could bring to a Prog Metal band though!

theremin would be cool. why not build your own? or look into a kit. harmonica? anyone? i know this is more about strings, but i do love me some harmonica
#17
i had that, instead of changing instruments i just bought a shit load of effects and made weird sounds
#18
Quote by innertom
i had that, instead of changing instruments i just bought a shit load of effects and made weird sounds


yeah, but i think he's trying to make himself more marketable to groups. the more instruments he plays, the better chance he has of being able to gig with a group.
#DTWD
#20
Quote by WaltTheWerewolf
anyone ever thought about or accually switched instruments due to lack of demand on your current? i am a folk musician who is well...an Acoustic Guitarist and well...when ever im trying to get a group going it seems everyone...EVERYONE! is a guitarist, and im tired of being just another guitarist sooo....i got some money coming my way and i think im going to invest in a decent Mandolin & an Octave Mandolin or Bouzouki.

ya hardly ever see anyone posting "Mandolin Player looking etc" but i always see people looking for a mandolin player etc.

sound lame? or a good idea? i do love the sound of the mandolin family so its not a sacrifice, but more of just something different to work at...

until then i guess i'll be workin the 12 string like mad to prepare for those insane doubled strings of the mandolins...

well i wouldnt call a mandolin obscure, but yes i actually have one and got it because it was something different. i dont play it much though. i know how to play basic major and minor chords on it and some scales. i was thinking about getting a melodica but havent got around to it yet.
#21
Quote by Blind In 1 Ear
i actually have one and got it because it was something different. i dont play it much though.


Thats the point I was trying to make.
shred is gaudy music