#1
OK I have used the search and found myself even more confused. Somebody help please.

Here are my questions.

Is there and minor pentatonic you can play over a chords in a major key?

To be in a minor key the 3rd and the 7th notes get dropped a half step???

It doesnt seem that that much music is written in minor keys to make the minor pentatonic relevant if it cant be played over major keys, or I am I completely lost?

Can the "Blue" notes be added in to the major pentatonic scale?
#3
in short, yes.

major vs minor doesnt matter too much when soloing over the same progression when it comes to pentatonics. for example, if you play blues in A (A, D, E) and solo over it in Am Pentatonic, you'll get a rockish sound. if you solo over the same progression in A major Pentatonic, you'll get more of a country vibe out of it (assuming you use them correctly).

plus you always have relative major and minors. Am pentatonic is C major pentatonic, A major is Gb minor, etc.
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#4
Quote by TK1

plus you always have relative major and minors. Am pentatonic is C major pentatonic, A major is Gb minor, etc.


A major is the relative of F# minor.
#5
Quote by TK1
plus you always have relative major and minors. Am pentatonic is C major pentatonic, A major is Gb minor, etc.


F# minor. i know it sounds the same as Gb minor but the relative major of Gb minor would be Bbb major. don't give me that look. yes, it makes a difference.

Quote by c0305
Is there and minor pentatonic you can play over a chords in a major key?


if i understand what you're asking, no. if you have a progression in C major, you could use the C major pentatonic scale. you could use the *pattern* that you associate with the A minor pentatonic scale, but you're still really using the C major pentatonic scale.

Quote by c0305
To be in a minor key the 3rd and the 7th notes get dropped a half step???


basically, yes. the 3rd, 6th, and 7th notes are flattened from a major scale to obtain its parallel minor.

Quote by c0305
It doesnt seem that that much music is written in minor keys to make the minor pentatonic relevant if it cant be played over major keys, or I am I completely lost?


why would you solo over a progression using a completely different scale? why would you solo over C major pentatonic using an A minor pentatonic scale? either you're forcing a second tonality or you're really soloing using C major. there are exceptions; for example, blues - soloing over a major progression using the parallel minor built from the tonic (but even then you still have only one tonic).

Quote by c0305
Can the "Blue" notes be added in to the major pentatonic scale?


yes, griff gave a good description of that.
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#6
i used to think it didnt make a difference but once i heard wish you were here by pink floyd i realized it does. (thats in g maj with a pentatonic scale riff- which is awesome imo) but then if you listen to the solo on another brick in the wall pt 2 (d min pentatonic) you can tell the different bluesy sound of it
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#7
Thanks.... I understood most of the replies. My Music Theory is a work in progrees but I got to start somewhere, right. Anybody else, chime in please. Id love as much feedback as possible.
#9
if i understand what you're asking, no. if you have a progression in C major, you could use the C major pentatonic scale. you could use the *pattern* that you associate with the A minor pentatonic scale, but you're still really using the C major pentatonic scale.


This
#10
LOADS of music is written in minor keys - I think you need to broaden your listening habits if you've not come across much.
#11
Quote by AeolianWolf

if i understand what you're asking, no. if you have a progression in C major, you could use the C major pentatonic scale. you could use the *pattern* that you associate with the A minor pentatonic scale, but you're still really using the C major pentatonic scale.


If I understand your reply, this is incorrect. If you're playing rock and you have a progression in C major, many players will use C minor pentatonic in addition to or instead of C major pentatonic. Blues is a prime example, but there are many classic rock examples as well.
#12
Quote by guitarviz
If I understand your reply, this is incorrect. If you're playing rock and you have a progression in C major, many players will use C minor pentatonic in addition to or instead of C major pentatonic. Blues is a prime example, but there are many classic rock examples as well.


i never brought up the C minor pentatonic once. i said A minor pentatonic.

and besides, i think everybody knows how to play blues. just take a progression that is not minor and play over it using a minor scale.
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#13
Quote by AeolianWolf
i never brought up the C minor pentatonic once. i said A minor pentatonic.

and besides, i think everybody knows how to play blues. just take a progression that is not minor and play over it using a minor scale.
Apparently not everyone does, though.
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