#1
Wrote a little tune, goes like this...


|-5-4-3-7-|
|-5-4-3-7-|
|-5-5-4-8-|
|-5-6-5-9-|
|-3-6-5-9-|
|---4-3-7-|


So that's a C6 (C, G, E, A), G#maj (G#, D#, C), Gmaj (G, D, B), Bmaj (B, F#, D#).

Am I correct in assuming this is not a diatonic progression? Or would it be more correct so say it modulates in key?

Thanks in advanced for any help here, I know it's not really important to the music but just so I know for future reference.
#2
I don't know what key but I would use G# double harmonic scale over the C6 and G#maj and G double harmonic over the Gmaj and Bmaj
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#3
it doesn't really modulate. you're just using accidentals. it's in C major. C6 is obviously diatonic. Abmaj is diatonic to the parallel minor. Gmaj is diatonic, and Bmaj slides chromatically into C major (could also be viewed as a mediant substitution off Gmaj).

Quote by 08L1V10N
I don't know what key but I would use G# double harmonic scale over the C6 and G#maj and G double harmonic over the Gmaj and Bmaj


this doesn't make much sense. what you'd do in this progression is use the C major scale and account for accidentals in chord tones (and there will be quite a few here). you can emphasize them for some nice color, but keep your tonic (unless you decide you want to modulate).
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#4
So that would be G#, A, B#, C#, D#, E, F## for the G# double harmonic and G, Ab, B, C, D, Eb, F# for the G double harmonic scale?

Some of these notes may be enharmonic to the correct naming, I just remembered that each note should have it's own letter. Seems wrong to have both sharps and flats in a scale but I do like the sound of playing these over the chords!

I attached a ZIP that contains a powertab and the midi of the song, at the start I have just gone through the scale as suggested by 08L1V10N.

I understand everything that you said AeolianWolf except for when you said 'keep your tonic unless you want to modulate'? Do you mean continue resolving to C with melody/accompaniment unless I want it to sound like a different key? Because this doesn't sound like it's in C to me anyways!
#6
Quote by squidlips
Some of these notes may be enharmonic to the correct naming, I just remembered that each note should have it's own letter. Seems wrong to have both sharps and flats in a scale but I do like the sound of playing these over the chords!


if you're not in a diatonic scale, that rule doesn't apply. it's pretty much only for the major and minor scale. in scales other than the diatonic, you typically want to try to adhere to the rule, but it's impossible in some instances, so you can't really avoid it.

Quote by squidlips
I understand everything that you said AeolianWolf except for when you said 'keep your tonic unless you want to modulate'? Do you mean continue resolving to C with melody/accompaniment unless I want it to sound like a different key? Because this doesn't sound like it's in C to me anyways!


what i mean is that unless you want to alter your progression to shift the tonal center, keep the tonic as C.

if you finish on a C6 chord, it's not going to sound very final. try replacing the last chord with Cmaj. extensions typically detract from a chord's finality. of course, if that's the sound you want, then go for it. it depends on what you're trying to achieve.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
Last edited by AeolianWolf at May 24, 2010,