#1
Hi all,

I've recently totally stripped a Yamaha Pacifica and repainted it etc. I found in a shop some guitar necks going cheap. They had a few dents in them so were going cheap so I bought one on the off chance that it'd fit the guitar (£15 was a bargain as far as I could see, so worth the risk).

Anyway, I thought I was really lucky because this neck fit perfectly! It was just the right height. However, after adjusting the truss rod and the string height, I've found that I can't properly intonate it. The 12th fret sounds too sharp compared with the harmonic there, but I've moved the saddle (?) all the way back so the string is at its maximum length.

I compared the new neck with the old one and found that the new one is about half an inch shorter than the old neck!

So... am I screwed? Will I have to go back to using the old beat up neck or buy one that's the same length or is there a way to fix this?

Thanks in advance!

tl;dr: The new neck I bought for my guitar is too short and is stopping me from getting the right intonation. Is there a way to fix this?
Last edited by grantjames at May 24, 2010,
#2
move the bridge?
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#3
Quote by julzius
move the bridge?


I don't think it's possible. The holes have already been drilled for it. I think it'd get very messy if I tried.
#5
You could also switch to a heavier string gauge. I don't know how far your intonation is off but if you put on heavier strings you just might be able to get your intonation right without having to move the bridge

Heavier strings also make for a fuller, beefier tone (sure, bending becomes a lot harder but fast picking will get easier). You could make this your rhythm guitar

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#6
Quote by shwilly
You could also switch to a heavier string gauge. I don't know how far your intonation is off but if you put on heavier strings you just might be able to get your intonation right without having to move the bridge

Heavier strings also make for a fuller, beefier tone (sure, bending becomes a lot harder but fast picking will get easier). You could make this your rhythm guitar


Awesome, I've put 9s on it, but I think I have some 12s so I'll give them a go.

Thanks for the advice.
#7
it sounds like the new neck is a diffrent scale length

if you want it to be intonated properly you are giong to have to mive the bridge
#8
Why not change the bridge position and fill the previous holes with pretty inlays? Would look beast.

(Assuming the bridge is mooved up, not down.)

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#10
You could also put a little wood at the base of the neck pocket to compensate a bit. Just enough so you can properly intonate.
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#11
Quote by grantjames
I compared the new neck with the old one and found that the new one is about half an inch shorter than the old neck!
A half inch? Holy mackerel. That's a long way.

Forget about changing string gauge. That will have the equivalent effect of moving the bridge a millimeter or two at the most. Save your money, on that one.

There are only two choices.
Move the bridge toward the tail, or move the neck farther away from the bridge.
If you can't do either, you can't fix this.
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#12
Thanks for all the extra input. I tried the .012 gauge strings, but this didn't work, sadly.

I'm tempted to put some wood at the base of the neck pocket, but wary about how this will look. It'll also mean drilling new holes in the neck and I don't want things to get too messy.

I think to move the bridge back, I'd have to do a lot of wood work to enable me to move the whole cavity that the bridge goes into backwards, because it has that whole metal chunk that the springs in the back hook on to.

Sooo, I think I'll try the extra wood at the base of the neck. I THINK, this might look ok if I can glue on a piece of wood and sand it down so that it looks like an extension.

I'll post pictures when I've attempted this!

Thanks again, everyone!
#13
Can you measure the length of the neck between the nut and the 12th fret just to see what the scale length is on the neck?
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#14
I'm being impatient and trying things out on it now, but can't do too much because it's the middle of the night

I measured the difference between the old and new necks, and it's exactly 1cm. So I screwed the neck in with a 1cm gap, between the bottom of the neck and the part where the neck usually makes contact with the body and it played almost perfectly in tune, even without adjusting any intonation.

It's not the prettiest solution seeing as I have a 1cm gap in my guitar, but I'll see what sort of wood I can fill it in with. Maybe I could use the old neck?

I can't get the neck fully flush into the body as I'm screwing by hand, so when it's on properly, I'll get some pictures of this nasty hack up!
#15
Ok, here's a picture of the neck with the 1cm gap between its base and the body! Screwed the neck on tightly with an electric screw driver and it feels nice and sturdy! I'm still going to cut off the bottom of the old neck to fill in this space though.

It looks really ugly in the picture, and on close inspection it is, but if you don't know what you're looking out for, it's not really immediately noticeable.
Attachments:
Photo-2.jpg
Last edited by grantjames at May 25, 2010,