#1
I am planning on starting Krav Maga in a few weeks, got my induction booked and I am really looking forward to it,

However I am quite slim and not particulary powerful in my upper body,

Can anybody reccomend any good exercises that would be relavavent to martial arts and improve my fitness/strength so it will be of benefit to me?

I know how to pump iron but I guess Krav Maga or any martial art requires a different approach?

I would really appreciate any help from you lot as I am at a bit of a loss really.

Thank you for your time,

Tom

1977 Burny FLG70
2004 EBMM JP6
2016 SE Holcolmb
#2
I've heard Krav Maga is really boring but I haven't tried it myself so I can't be sure
#3
Quote by kalnoky7
I've heard Krav Maga is really boring but I haven't tried it myself so I can't be sure

Krav Maga is the ultimate Martial Art. Any person who disagrees is welcome to have a go at the Mossad.

THIS POST WAS NOT EDITED BY THE MOSSAD
#5
Plyometric exercises like box pushups and plyometric pullups are important to build speed and power in your upper body. Don't stop there though, you need to do the fundamentals like bench pressing and seated rows if you want to build a foundation of strength to support your speed/power. Lots of people will tell you a bench press will never do you good in the real world but by doing things like single arm dumbbell bench presses you'll develop core strength and important upper body strength for punching at the same time. My advice - do at least one day of fundamental heavy strength exercises and another day of plyometric and power exercises per week.

*Source: Personal trainer, ex-infantryman, black belt in karate and student of jiu-jitsu
#6
Quote by jimmyled
Krav Maga is the ultimate Martial Art. Any person who disagrees is welcome to have a go at the Mossad.

THIS POST WAS NOT EDITED BY THE MOSSAD



Yes, I know it's badass, but I've been told it's really boring to learn.
#7
Quote by Necronomicon
Plyometric exercises like box pushups and plyometric pullups are important to build speed and power in your upper body. Don't stop there though, you need to do the fundamentals like bench pressing and seated rows if you want to build a foundation of strength to support your speed/power. Lots of people will tell you a bench press will never do you good in the real world but by doing things like single arm dumbbell bench presses you'll develop core strength and important upper body strength for punching at the same time. My advice - do at least one day of fundamental heavy strength exercises and another day of plyometric and power exercises per week.

*Source: Personal trainer, ex-infantryman, black belt in karate and student of jiu-jitsu



Thank you for the great answer,

I dont mean to be ignorant but could explain what the difference between plyometric excercise to "normal" weights and exercise,

sorry.

1977 Burny FLG70
2004 EBMM JP6
2016 SE Holcolmb
#8
No problem;

Plyometric exercises are exercises that develop the fast twitch fibers in your muscles. They're activities that don't necessarily use heavy weights but require you to work at "full throttle" for a certain number of reps. Lemme give you an example: A standard weighted exercise is something like a squat where you use a heavy weight and perform the motion within ~2 seconds. On the other hand, a plyometric leg exercise could be using a light-medium weight and squatting down then jumping as high as possible. The difference is that in a regular exercise you are increasing the total amount of strength in that muscle and in a plyometric exercise you increase the amount of strength you can put out in a split second, like in a punch or a jump. Obviously this is important in martial arts because you need to be fast if you want anything to hit your opponent and increasing power increases speed.
#9
ok i get you, thank you for taking the time to help.

so "push off" push ups sort of things?

Would you be able to reccomend a site or sites with a good sort of planned regeime? I am not lazy but i am completely unsure of what is really required as I have no martial arts experience and I rally dont want to turn up and be completely helpless, though I am sure thats going to happen anyway

I am googling but i can only find people trying to sell me books and the like which isnt really helpful,

Sorry to be so useless, I feel guilty as I guess you noramlly get paid for giving out this sort of advice!

1977 Burny FLG70
2004 EBMM JP6
2016 SE Holcolmb
#11
If you're worried about the power of your punches, it comes from relaxation of the arm muscles until the moment of impact, not so much muscle power.
Comic




SAAAAAAAAANNNNNSSSS!!!!
#12
I'm curious as to why you want to learn Krav Maga? From what I've always seen it looks like you can't even hardly use it unless you intend to kill the person.
#13
I am in the process of training for the police Specials with the aims of joining full time after uni,

My dad is a police officer has suggested this would be ideal to do as the basis of the self defense they use and he teaches is loosely based around this, I would ask him but getting the chance to spend time with him to do it is very limited.

as for it being mainly for killing people, there are three branches of the technique, split into defensive and offensive stuff

anybody else got anything they could add to what i should be doing?

1977 Burny FLG70
2004 EBMM JP6
2016 SE Holcolmb
#14
Quote by Tom 1.0
I am in the process of training for the police Specials with the aims of joining full time after uni,

My dad is a police officer has suggested this would be ideal to do as the basis of the self defense they use and he teaches is loosely based around this, I would ask him but getting the chance to spend time with him to do it is very limited.

as for it being mainly for killing people, there are three branches of the technique, split into defensive and offensive stuff

anybody else got anything they could add to what i should be doing?


Sounds reasonable enough. Good luck with your life goals they're pretty much identical to mine.
#15
Thanks mate,

you too

1977 Burny FLG70
2004 EBMM JP6
2016 SE Holcolmb
#16
Hey sorry for the late reply I haven't been watching the thread closely. So as for what "jeffbecklad" said, that's true, you will get more power if you relax your arm muscles until the moment of impact. However you'll also get a LOT more power if you train properly.

Since I don't really know what your physical abilities are, what facilities are available or your athletic background, I'll give you some exercises and ideas you can use to develop your upper body rather than some type of routine. To create a good foundation of muscle for your chest and back, start by performing powerful multi-muscle exercises such as the bench press, seated row, and shoulder press. Avoid exercises that isolate specific muscles like bicep curls or tricep pulldowns, they're really only for people that want to LOOK good rather than have functional strength. Many actions in martial arts and life are composite and use more than one muscle, might as well train them that way. Once you have those exercises down, try and make them more difficult by doing them one hand at a time with a dumbbell since this will force your core muscles to keep your body stable and help to develop your body as a unit. It will also get you tired and force you to increase your endurance.

As for your plyometric exercises, you want to do them at the start of a workout when your muscles are fresh so that you can exert maximum force throughout. Plyometric exercises are any exercises that use ballistic movements. To train your chest and back using plyometrics, the following 4 exercises are good, google them if you need details:

For the chest, box pushups and medicine ball pushups. For back, using a cable machine, forcefully pull the cable in a rowing motion as you would to start a gas lawnmower, then slowly return the cable to the starting position. Each pull is 1 rep. Alternatively, you can do the same motion with a pullup or chinup.

If you go to bodybuilding.com (it's not just a bodybuilding site) and look at some of their articles they will probably help you too. Read with care though because some people that write on that site really don't know what they're talking about. Luckily you should be able to find lots of information if you look hard, good luck.
#17
Quote by Necronomicon
Hey sorry for the late reply I haven't been watching the thread closely. So as for what "jeffbecklad" said, that's true, you will get more power if you relax your arm muscles until the moment of impact. However you'll also get a LOT more power if you train properly.

Since I don't really know what your physical abilities are, what facilities are available or your athletic background, I'll give you some exercises and ideas you can use to develop your upper body rather than some type of routine. To create a good foundation of muscle for your chest and back, start by performing powerful multi-muscle exercises such as the bench press, seated row, and shoulder press. Avoid exercises that isolate specific muscles like bicep curls or tricep pulldowns, they're really only for people that want to LOOK good rather than have functional strength. Many actions in martial arts and life are composite and use more than one muscle, might as well train them that way. Once you have those exercises down, try and make them more difficult by doing them one hand at a time with a dumbbell since this will force your core muscles to keep your body stable and help to develop your body as a unit. It will also get you tired and force you to increase your endurance.

As for your plyometric exercises, you want to do them at the start of a workout when your muscles are fresh so that you can exert maximum force throughout. Plyometric exercises are any exercises that use ballistic movements. To train your chest and back using plyometrics, the following 4 exercises are good, google them if you need details:

For the chest, box pushups and medicine ball pushups. For back, using a cable machine, forcefully pull the cable in a rowing motion as you would to start a gas lawnmower, then slowly return the cable to the starting position. Each pull is 1 rep. Alternatively, you can do the same motion with a pullup or chinup.

If you go to bodybuilding.com (it's not just a bodybuilding site) and look at some of their articles they will probably help you too. Read with care though because some people that write on that site really don't know what they're talking about. Luckily you should be able to find lots of information if you look hard, good luck.



Thank you very much,

I'll check it out,

once again, thanks for your help and time mate

1977 Burny FLG70
2004 EBMM JP6
2016 SE Holcolmb
#18
Quote by jimmyled
Krav Maga is the ultimate Martial Art. Any person who disagrees is welcome to have a go at the Mossad.


There is no ultimate Martial Art.
There is only better fighter.

And for upper body, try pushup jumps(you know, clapping and stuff).
It trains your back muscles which is important in training strength of punches.
        Last edited by magick0108 at May 25, 2010,
        #19
        Quote by Tom 1.0
        I am planning on starting Krav Maga in a few weeks, got my induction booked and I am really looking forward to it,

        However I am quite slim and not particulary powerful in my upper body,

        Can anybody reccomend any good exercises that would be relavavent to martial arts and improve my fitness/strength so it will be of benefit to me?

        I know how to pump iron but I guess Krav Maga or any martial art requires a different approach?

        I would really appreciate any help from you lot as I am at a bit of a loss really.

        Thank you for your time,

        Tom


        From what I've heard, unless you're with the Israeli military, Krav Maga classes are more for self defense for women. I'm sure that there are some that aren't like this, but I've never heard of them.
        Quote by :Vicious--
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        "Don't touch my buttsecks"
        #20
        I just do standard strength training along side my MA. Seems to be working fine, I'm getting bigger but staying trim, flexible and fast.
        No man has the right to be an amateur in the matter of physical training. It is a shame for a man to grow old without seeing the beauty and strength of which his body is capable


        @gossage91
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        #21
        Be sure you know what you're getting into. I read about this Krav Maga trainer in the papers who broke his student's fingers to make sure they were committed enough to learn.

        Good Luck, I did Judo
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        #22
        Quote by Necronomicon
        Since I don't really know what your physical abilities are, what facilities are available or your athletic background, I'll give you some exercises and ideas you can use to develop your upper body rather than some type of routine. To create a good foundation of muscle for your chest and back, start by performing powerful multi-muscle exercises such as the bench press, seated row, and shoulder press. Avoid exercises that isolate specific muscles like bicep curls or tricep pulldowns, they're really only for people that want to LOOK good rather than have functional strength. Many actions in martial arts and life are composite and use more than one muscle, might as well train them that way. Once you have those exercises down, try and make them more difficult by doing them one hand at a time with a dumbbell since this will force your core muscles to keep your body stable and help to develop your body as a unit. It will also get you tired and force you to increase your endurance.


        Why can you not do both, compound and single join? If you want to get stronger arms, you have to.... train your arms. That does not mean you can't knock yourself out on compound movements.

        "Functional strength?" I think curling 100lbs dumbbels is pretty damn ****ing functional.
        I am a postmodern vegetarian, I eat meat ironically.
        #23
        Quote by Toolshed#9
        Why can you not do both, compound and single join? If you want to get stronger arms, you have to.... train your arms. That does not mean you can't knock yourself out on compound movements.

        "Functional strength?" I think curling 100lbs dumbbels is pretty damn ****ing functional.


        I don't. Do you curl your furniture when you are moving? Do you curl your girlfriend when you pick her up? Do you curl your briefcase, your backpack, your purse... anything in the world other than a dumbbell? I say compound movements because a) he wants a strong upper body not a strong arm, pressing and pulling work both the arms and torso at the same time, and b) single joint exercises will make you look nice but the body functions as a unit or fractions of a unit (arms, legs), it doesn't function as a single bicep or a forearm. If someone increases their rowing strength or pullup strength, they will increase their bicep curl strength AND the strength of their other muscles. I'm moving on from this thread now, cheers.
        #24
        I train in Kyokushin Karate and Olympic style Tae Kwon Do.

        Krav Maga is on my list of arts to work with.

        Don't listen to any of the idiots that say it's boring or for women. You make the class as hard as you want it.

        But anyway, start training with light weights and doing lots of reps. You want a lot of lean muscle, also, steenthen your shoulders and your lower back.

        Just some simple advice.
        #25
        Tom, you don't need martial arts.


        You just need to learn to run faster.
        has a terrible signature.