#1
I have been working on scales for a long time now. After a month of work i can find all the diatonic and pentatonic scales in all 12 keys in all 5 positions on the fretboard. I can also improvise with them pretty damn well. The only problem is that it takes me at least ten seconds to find each scale. This is because i dont know the fretboard very well. I figure that okay because eventually ill know it. I also don't know the notes in each scale but am working on that right now. Anyways do you sugges tlearning the notes in each pentatonic an diatonic ( minor an dmajor scaleS) or should i just learn the root notes. But mainly what im asking is should i memorize the scales exactly so i know them without thinking? or is that not really neccessary? I can figure them out. Is it okay that i figure out the minor scales because i understand the theory behind relative major and minor scales? Pretty much what i am asking for is gerneal feedbakc on scales?
#2
Quote by Bfrederi
I have been working on scales for a long time now. After a month of work i can find all the diatonic and pentatonic scales in all 12 keys in all 5 positions on the fretboard. I can also improvise with them pretty damn well. The only problem is that it takes me at least ten seconds to find each scale. This is because i dont know the fretboard very well. I figure that okay because eventually ill know it. I also don't know the notes in each scale but am working on that right now. Anyways do you sugges tlearning the notes in each pentatonic an diatonic ( minor an dmajor scaleS) or should i just learn the root notes. But mainly what im asking is should i memorize the scales exactly so i know them without thinking? or is that not really neccessary? I can figure them out. Is it okay that i figure out the minor scales because i understand the theory behind relative major and minor scales? Pretty much what i am asking for is gerneal feedbakc on scales?

YES. No doubt about it. Learn what notes are in each scale and where they are on the fretboard. If it takes you 10 seconds to find each scale, it is taking 9.9 seconds too long. It shouldn't require much that at all, it should be second nature.
Quote by AA00P
Listen to the man, he's Jewish.
#3
Quote by guitarsftw
YES. No doubt about it. Learn what notes are in each scale and where they are on the fretboard. If it takes you 10 seconds to find each scale, it is taking 9.9 seconds too long. It shouldn't require much that at all, it should be second nature.


this. if you don't know the notes of the scale, get on that, because you don't really know the scale. if you can play the patterns, that's a plus - you're training your fingers well. but there's a lot more to soloing than positions. in fact, positions should ideally be an extremely minimal factor in soloing. be conscious of what you're playing.

play the guitar. don't let the guitar play you.

EDIT: i notice this is the third thread you posted about scales (or at least the third that i responded to). so let me say this: don't stop until you know each individual scale like the back of your hand. i don't want to belittle or discourage you, man, but you've been playing for, what, 3 months? you're nowhere near the time when you can honestly stop (in fact, you should ideally never stop).

it's good that you're thinking about all this, because a lot of people don't, especially when they first start. but there's still a hell of a lot more work to be done.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
Last edited by AeolianWolf at May 24, 2010,
#5
Quote by AeolianWolf
play the guitar. don't let the guitar play you.

Not to be a dick, but to me it works better:

The guitar doesn't play the music, you play the music.
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#6
Quote by Bfrederi
I have been working on scales for a long time now. After a month of work i can find all the diatonic and pentatonic scales in all 12 keys in all 5 positions on the fretboard. I can also improvise with them pretty damn well. The only problem is that it takes me at least ten seconds to find each scale. This is because i dont know the fretboard very well. I figure that okay because eventually ill know it. I also don't know the notes in each scale but am working on that right now. Anyways do you sugges tlearning the notes in each pentatonic an diatonic ( minor an dmajor scaleS) or should i just learn the root notes. But mainly what im asking is should i memorize the scales exactly so i know them without thinking? or is that not really neccessary? I can figure them out. Is it okay that i figure out the minor scales because i understand the theory behind relative major and minor scales? Pretty much what i am asking for is gerneal feedbakc on scales?


learning scale patterns is a good base to begin with...but it can also be a trap as some players never go beyond the pattern and cant find a C scale if its not in the set pattern..

start playing the scale from the 7th degree of the scale, the 2nd 3rd etc until you can play it from any note in it ... then move it up a fifth and go through that scale move that up a fifth etc until you can play any scale from any note on the fretboard...try it with 3rds and fourths etc until you are comfortabe with all intervals and every degree of the scale

learn simple melodies to play within each scale to help you learn the notes and give you a sense of melodic interval play...try jingle bells, happy bday etc...sounds silly but more complex melodies will be easier to breakdown if you have done this and are comfortabe with "finding melodies within the scale"..this is a skill in itself

play well

wolf
#7
Quote by Bfrederi
I have been working on scales for a long time now. After a month of work i can find all the diatonic and pentatonic scales in all 12 keys in all 5 positions on the fretboard.


One month isn't very long. It sounds like you're going well so far. Just continue, and learn to apply the scales.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#8
Quote by hockeyplayer168
Not to be a dick, but to me it works better:

The guitar doesn't play the music, you play the music.


i understand that whole "the instrument is an illusion, you are the instrument" theory, but try playing music without an instrument. get back to me, let me know how it goes.

exactly. you play the music, but that's because you play the guitar, and the guitar plays the music. it's a logic thing.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#9
Quote by AeolianWolf
i understand that whole "the instrument is an illusion, you are the instrument" theory, but try playing music without an instrument. get back to me, let me know how it goes.

exactly. you play the music, but that's because you play the guitar, and the guitar plays the music. it's a logic thing.

Well, if I'm making music without an instrument, I usually just hear it in my head. Then I hear voices and I cry.
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#10
The ability to find any note on the neck is crucial as a foundation to understanding the guitar. In my opinion you are unfortunately going about it in such a way that will use up a lot of unnecessary time to learn the notes.

If you do get there eventually it will be like cutting down a tree using a spoon. Provided you spend a lot of time you'll eventually get there.

Most people do it this way, but it doesnt have to take that long.

Best,

Sean