#1
Sometimes I don't know why, we'd rather live than die.
We look up towards the sky, for answers to our lives.
We may get some solutions, but most just pass us by.
Don't want your absolution, 'cause I can't make it right.

you lost the game
#2
well one of them is twice the price of the other so I'm gonna go with that one.
You're using UG classic, congratulations.
You should be using UG classic.




E-Married to Guitar0Player

http://the llama forum because its gone forever which sucks and I hate it.
#3
Better for what kind of application? Are you going to be running them with an amp? Is your stock location the right size? Will you have to modify to install components?
Hi, I'm Peter
#5
I have a nice old Buick with a Bose system. I listen to rock, blues, metal, no country or rap. I will not be running them through an amp. The rear speakers (they still work) sound great. The door speakers are the ones that need to be replaced. They're 5.25 inch speakers and yes they're the right size I checked that.
Sometimes I don't know why, we'd rather live than die.
We look up towards the sky, for answers to our lives.
We may get some solutions, but most just pass us by.
Don't want your absolution, 'cause I can't make it right.

you lost the game
#6
In your situation, I'd go with the lowest RMS wattage 5.25" speaker I could find. Depending on the model Buick, you may have stock components (I had a '96 Regal Gran Sport once upon a time). Problem is, most aftermarket components have a much higher RMS wattage rating than what factory systems (or even aftermarket head units) produce. You can also damage them running them with too little RMS power (which is true for any speaker).
Hi, I'm Peter
#7
Quote by Dirk Gently
In your situation, I'd go with the lowest RMS wattage 5.25" speaker I could find. Depending on the model Buick, you may have stock components (I had a '96 Regal Gran Sport once upon a time). Problem is, most aftermarket components have a much higher RMS wattage rating than what factory systems (or even aftermarket head units) produce. You can also damage them running them with too little RMS power (which is true for any speaker).

This. Plus your sound quality should be better if you can get a little closer to the powerhandling range. I'd guess your head unit is a 45x4 so each of your 4 speakers should get 1/4th of 45 watts. If you have 6 speakers, it's 1/6th. So you really don't want speakers that are too powerful.
#8
^ That's not exactly how car audio wattage ratings work.

For example, most aftermarket head units are advertised as 50x4w. That means, their max wattage is 50 watts @ 4 ohms for each channel. In reality, the RMS rating is usually around 18-20 watts @ 4 ohms for each channel, so 18-20x4 @ 4 ohms. When an amp is rated watts times number of channels, that's telling you how many watts per channel you can expect (either max or RMS @ a certain ohm rating), not the total number of watts and how it's being broken up.
Hi, I'm Peter
#9
Don't get a big brand name speaker.
Seriously, most speakers now are a populatrity competition.
Take skullcandy for example. If you don't have their headphones, your uncool.
They are actually pieces of shit, but according to society, they are cool.
That's my rant.

I'd go with the more expensive one.
..I was watching my death.
#10
Quote by Dirk Gently
^ That's not exactly how car audio wattage ratings work.

For example, most aftermarket head units are advertised as 50x4w. That means, their max wattage is 50 watts @ 4 ohms for each channel. In reality, the RMS rating is usually around 18-20 watts @ 4 ohms for each channel, so 18-20x4 @ 4 ohms. When an amp is rated watts times number of channels, that's telling you how many watts per channel you can expect (either max or RMS @ a certain ohm rating), not the total number of watts and how it's being broken up.

I'm embarrassed. I should have known, since my 50x4 highs amp is 200 watts. I haven't slept much