#1
Hey guys, recently I've got quite a few suggestions to practice legato on an acoustic guitar. I have no doubt that it can develop finger strength for electric, but I'm thinking that there might be more than that. Can any harm come out of practicing in this manner? Can it perhaps hurt electric technique?

Thanks in advance.
#2
There shouldn't be any harm that comes of it. When you switch between them the biggest problem you may have is that it will perhaps take you a very short while to adjust. There should be no lasting detrimental effects.
Last edited by jfreyvogel at May 25, 2010,
#3
The most damage will be in the pressure you hammer on with, but thats a really easy adjustment. I've snapped strings hitting them too hard, but they were old strings. Yeah, its a good suggestion. Better to play it acoustically to learn to do it cleanly.
#4
Quote by L2112Lif
Better to play it acoustically to learn to do it cleanly.


This.

Ultimately, you're trying to build up the strength and agility of your fingers (for volume and speed respectively) for legato. Acoustic (steel string) guitars are a great way to do this because the strings are heavier and the action tends to be higher- so your fingers get a good workout.

Anyway, you really want to be able to play both acoustic and electric and if you only play electric you'll find acoustic hard!
#5
Quote by chainsawguitar
This.

Ultimately, you're trying to build up the strength and agility of your fingers (for volume and speed respectively) for legato. Acoustic (steel string) guitars are a great way to do this because the strings are heavier and the action tends to be higher- so your fingers get a good workout.

Anyway, you really want to be able to play both acoustic and electric and if you only play electric you'll find acoustic hard!



Sure man, I'll get to it today. Thanks for the advice.

Btw, I checked out your site. You're a hella sick guitarist, man.

#7
Practicing on an acoustic at times over the years has helped me tremendously with a few things, notably legato, barre chords, and not relying on gain to bring out notes. I liken it to those weights that baseball players put on their bats to warm up with.
#8
I totally disagree.

You should practice legato on an amplified electric guitar, using a clean/low gain tone with no compression when focusing on sounding every note correctly with correct dynamics, and with a higher gain tone when focusing on dampening.
My name is Tom, feel free to use it.
#9
It helps finger strength for sure. It hasn't hampered my electric playing, only helped.
What you could also do to workout on an acoustic is do some counterpoint exercises; that will help a lot with finger independence.