#1
im learning theory from this book called harmony and theory

im at the beggening "major scale" and its talking about the fomula (wwhwwwh)

and it used the key of C as an example C D E F G A B C

theres no sharps in this key becuase theres no E# and no B# right? well when it went onto the f# major scale it says the nots are F# G# A# B C# D# E# F#

the book it probably right but im just a little confused
better shred than dead
#2
thats right in F major, there is only a Bb. For F# major, move that all up one half step, and you end up with 6 sharps, and then the B.
The formula is right. F# to G# =whole, G# to A#=w, A# to B=half, and so on

C is where most people start out with the major scale because there are no sharps or flats
#3
Yep. For F#

F# G# A# B C# D# E# F#
W W H W W W H

Look at a keyboard for help. I don't have a good graphic, but you can find it online.

EDIT: The spacing is stupid
Last edited by L2112Lif at May 25, 2010,
#4
The second one (starting on F#) is still WWHWWWH

There will be sharps depending on what key you're in.

C is common for the major scale because there aren't any sharps/flats.
#5
but i cant make the scale on my guitar because i cant find a e#
better shred than dead
#6
Quote by ChucklesMginty
It's because you can't use the same letter more than once in a scale.

Saying F instead of E# would technically be wrong because F has already been 'used up' by the F#.


This.

And E# is enharmonic to F, ie you play an F when it says E#.
#7
Quote by goodolcola
This.

And E# is enharmonic to F, ie you play an F when it says E#.


oh

so when ever it says E# it means F

and B# it means C
better shred than dead
#9
Quote by shredda2084
oh

so when ever it says E# it means F

and B# it means C



No
When it says E#, it means E#, but it is the same as F. It says E# because of the way it's related to the scale. From a basic notes standpoint, you could say when it says E#, but from a theory standpoint, that would be wrong.
#10
Quote by guns_rosesldb
No
When it says E#, it means E#, but it is the same as F. It says E# because of the way it's related to the scale. From a basic notes standpoint, you could say when it says E#, but from a theory standpoint, that would be wrong.


this. an E# and an F, a Cb and a B, a G# and an Ab -- these are all the same, but only in sound. in theory (and also in the perspective of written music on a staff), they are completely different notes.

but for practical purposes, if you see an E#, what you should think is not "i'll play an F", but rather, "i'll play a note that sounds like an F". got me?
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#11
Hey, we all know E# and F are the same note (Known as enharmonic equivalent, or just enharmonic), they're just written differently on paper because it depends on the scale. For the sake of being concise, In the key of F# (F# G# A# B C# D# E# F#) It couldn't say F# G# A# B C# D# F F#, because that would be confusing and it would look weird to have two of the same note names written down, so what would be that F becomes E#. I hope that makes sense.
#12
You're sharpening the note that's normally an E. It sounds the same as F, and you play the same fret as you would to play an F, but it would be a nightmare to read on a staff if it was just written as F.
The guy's a beast, but he uses 8s. So he's shit.
-juckfush on Alex Hutchings.