#1
The question concerns the following sentence, part of a history paper I am writing:
"Jonathan Paine arrives at home just in time to see his father’s boat pass by his house, unaware of who is inside."

should it be "who" or "whom"? My teacher says it's whom, but I'm not sure.
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#2
It doesn't make sense grammatically to not know who is inside a house.

EDIT: **** well I ruined that joke by not reading your sentence properly...
EDIT 2: actually i can't understand what your sentence means. Is the boat unaware of who is in the house, or is the fella unaware of who is inside the boat?
Last edited by MadClownDisease at May 25, 2010,
#3
I would say arrives home instead of arrives at home. And it can be either, but whom is quite archaic now, I would use who.


If your teacher is marking it, use whom. It's all about playing up to what they are looking for in their marking
#4
Who is unaware of who's inside what? I'm not sure what your sentence is supposed to mean.
#5
Wouldn't be 'who was' inside?
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#6
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Wouldn't be 'who was' inside?


No because the first verb is in the present tense too.
#7
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I would say arrives home instead of arrives at home. And it can be either, but whom is quite archaic now, I would use who.


If your teacher is marking it, use whom. It's all about playing up to what they are looking for in their marking


This.

I used "whom" in a text message yesterday and got the equivalent of "ಠ_ಠ" back.
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#11
Well, considering it's an indirect objective, it would be "whom," what is more annoying to me is the hanging preposition at the end of the sentence.

EDIT: Nevermind the hanging preposition thing; inside functions as a noun in that sentence. Anyways, if it's used as an objective, it's supposed to be whom.

http://grammar.quickanddirtytips.com/who-versus-whom.aspx

In these days, whom is usually reserved for use at the end of a prepositional phrase. Such as, "Professor Stevens, to whom were you referring during your lecture?"

EDIT2: Christ, I'm not sure. Google it, man. I keep changing my mind.
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Last edited by Spartan070sarge at May 25, 2010,
#12
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Whom


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#13
Not a grammer nazi, but "whom" is usually used before a noun, not a person, like you say in your sentence. I think. I may be wrong about this, though.

Even though it does sound a bit awkward, I would say "who" Is right.
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#14
"Jonathan Paine arrives (at home) just (in time) to see his father’s boat pass (by his house), unaware of (who is inside)."

Who is correct, because "who is inside" all acts as a single unit and "who" is the subject of that unit.
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should it be "who" or "whom"? My teacher says it's whom, but I'm not sure.

Your teacher is wrong, but you should do it his/her way anyway. Whom will be out of the language soon anyway.
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Well, considering it's an indirect objective, it would be "whom," what is more annoying to me is the hanging preposition at the end of the sentence.

It's not an indirect object, and "inside" is an adverb here.

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Last edited by SteveHouse at May 25, 2010,
#16
There is a lot more wrong with that sentence than just the who/whom. It would make a lot more sense if you completely rewrote what was after the comma.
#17
Im not going to go into which is correct, but just satisfy your teacher and use "whom." Your GPA will thank you.
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#19
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#20
Whom. Who is the subject, whom is the direct object. The subject is what makes the action, and the direct object is what receives it.
#21
I have no real basis but if I were writing I'd probably use whom just cause it sounds better. I find myself to use 'whom' very often in writing, guess I'm strange.
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#22
Quote by bloodtrocuted93
Whom. Who is the subject, whom is the direct object. The subject is what makes the action, and the direct object is what receives it.

It's not the direct object in this sentence. It's the subject of a clause that makes the object of the preposition "of".

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#23
Quote by SteveHouse
It's not the direct object in this sentence. It's the subject of a clause that makes the object of the preposition "of".

Correctamundo. It's "who" but I don't know if you should tell your teacher...
#24
Quote by Consort BV
you're teacher is always right.

Apparently yours wasn't...

And it's who, I think.
As in "...unaware of the person who is inside."
#26
Quote by SteveHouse
It's not the direct object in this sentence. It's the subject of a clause that makes the object of the preposition "of".

Oops, you're right. Should've read that more closely.
#28
it is who. but i agree it's not necessarily the best structured of sentences, i'd rewrite the whole thing. ignore your teacher.
#29
i'm going with "who"
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