#1
Hey Pit,

I've come to you all before with science questions and usually I get some pretty good answers

So riddle me this, Pit...

I have a copper penny attached to the negative terminal of a 9V battery. I have a nickel (made of the metal nickel) attached to the positive terminal. I put this circuit in water. After 20 minutes, I notice that the nickel has orange deposits on it which I believe are copper.

Why does this work? It doesn't make sense to me. I thought copper had a positive charge and would not be attracted to another positively charged object.

Any one who can explain gets an e-cookie

Thanks!
#2
Well, a positive times a positive gives you a negative. And a Negative times a negative gieves you a positive. As such.

Positive Battery X Positive Nickel = Negative Nickel
Negative Battery X Neutral Penny = Negative Penny (or copper)

Which essential will give you:

Negative Nickel X Negative Penny = ______

You eliminate the two negatives so

Nickel X Penny = Nickel with Penny Spots.


Anything else?
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#4
Are you using distilled water?

There's an arseload of ions in normal water, and that's what you're separating. Orange stuff ain't copper.
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