#1
Alright i think im starting to get theory a little bit but i just had some questions.

I know the steps to make a major scale and that you use the 1,3,5 degrees to make a triad chord. And you flat the third to make a minor triad.

My first question is if i use a C (8th fret on the E string, 7th fret on the A, and 5th fret on the D, i think thats all i play?) and then make a D using the same method and a G using the same method and just play it in some strumming progression,1. is that in the key of C?

2. And i could solo over it with the C major scale or C minor pentatonic in any one of the 5 positions?

3. Also, is this the same with power chords? Could i play an C5,D5,G5 and use these scales over it?

4. And finally, when are those triad chords ever used. I never usually see any(like the 3 string C i mentioned above) in any songs.

Also, feel free to correct anything i have just said, im sure something up there is wrong.
#2
IThey key of C does not have a D chord. This would be in the key of G. The G major scale will be played, though variations can be used over certain chords. A progression of C5, D5, G5, will still be in G. Triad chords are used in 99.9999% of music. That shape might not be the most common (I personally use them a lot), a C chord is still a triad no matter how you choose to play one.

EDIT: Actually let me restate something there. A progression of C5, D5, G5 - yes it will fit where a C, D, G progression has been used. BUT, on it's own it does not imply a key. If you hear this powerchord progression on it's own, your ear will probably decide that it is in G, however there are only 4 notes here, so there are a lot of keys and scales that will fit over it. So it will depends on the notes played by the other instruments.
Last edited by Macabre_Turtle at May 26, 2010,
#3
they are used by some artists, just not nearly as often as power chords, because they are a bit harder to get to, and they sound a bit different. and i'm pretty sure you can solo over them with those scales. i don't see why that would change just due to different inversions.
#4
1. The chords in the key of C are: C, Dm, Em, F, G, Am, Bdim

2. You could use C major or relative minor scale, which is A minor. And yes any of five positions would do.

3. Power chords are nor major nor minor, so these scales would do.

4. Search harder
#5
Quote by guitar102938475
Alright i think im starting to get theory a little bit but i just had some questions.

I know the steps to make a major scale and that you use the 1,3,5 degrees to make a triad chord. And you flat the third to make a minor triad.

My first question is if i use a C (8th fret on the E string, 7th fret on the A, and 5th fret on the D, i think thats all i play?) and then make a D using the same method and a G using the same method and just play it in some strumming progression,1. is that in the key of C?
It's already been said before, so I don't want to beat a dead horse, but that would imply G major, since C D and G are all in G major, plus this is a common chord progression in G major (predominant, more specifically subdominant; dominant; tonic).

Quote by guitar102938475
2. And i could solo over it with the C major scale or C minor pentatonic in any one of the 5 positions?
Well you have a lot of options depending on the sound you're going for. Naturally, since it's in the key of G you're going to use those scales except in relation to G (G major, G minor pentatonic, etc.). For the sake of simplicity, I'm just going to tell you to try G major and the G major pentatonic. Once you get comfortable with that then you can move to altering these a bit more.

Quote by guitar102938475
3. Also, is this the same with power chords? Could i play an C5,D5,G5 and use these scales over it?
It's practically the same, although tonality is a bit out of whack when you use power chords, as they don't have a major or a minor quality. Sometimes it can be implied, but not with a progression like that. You kind of have to force a tonality. You could use either G major, G natural minor, or even possibly G harmonic or melodic minor (or even some further-altered major/minor scales).

Quote by guitar102938475
4. And finally, when are those triad chords ever used. I never usually see any(like the 3 string C i mentioned above) in any songs.
Triads are used everywhere. They just may not look the way you wrote them out. This may help; I'm gonna write out a few different voicings for these three chords for you:

C
-0--3--8--
-1--5--8--
-0--5--9--
-2--5--10-
-3--3--10-
-------8--

D
-2--5--10-
-3--7--10-
-2--7--11-
-0--7--12-
----5--12-
-------10-

G
-3--3--10-
-3--3--12-
-0--4--12-
-0--5--12-
-2--5--10-
-3--3-----
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#6
thanks....all of this info helped me understand a lot better...just one more question


Since most power chords are neither major nor minor, how do most metal musicians come up with which ones to play under a solo?
Last edited by guitar102938475 at May 26, 2010,
#7
Quote by guitar102938475
thanks....all of this info helped me understand a lot better...just one more question


Since most power chords are neither major nor minor, how do most metal musicians come up with which ones to play under a solo?


It's no different than deciding on any other kinds of chords. If it will work in triads, it will work in powerchords. I find many bands just continue playing a riff however, and not necessarily playing a chord progression.
#8
alright...this will probably be a lot harder to explain and i probably wont understand it but...

How do you know what key a riff is in if it uses a muted open E string for example with some power chords or individual notes?

Could someone give me an example of a song that just plays the riff while the solo plays and what key its in?
#9
Quote by guitar102938475
alright...this will probably be a lot harder to explain and i probably wont understand it but...

How do you know what key a riff is in if it uses a muted open E string for example with some power chords or individual notes?

Could someone give me an example of a song that just plays the riff while the solo plays and what key its in?


In any case, finding the key or scale is to simply ask "what scale do these notes fit into." More often than not, if a riff involves notes or powerchords in between E chugs, it will be in some form of E minor scale.

From about 1:18 to 1:30 here is a Bmin solo over a Bmin riff that doesn't necessarily imply any chords.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E7yWtZS6qP8
#10
Quote by guitar102938475
alright...this will probably be a lot harder to explain and i probably wont understand it but...

How do you know what key a riff is in if it uses a muted open E string for example with some power chords or individual notes?

Could someone give me an example of a song that just plays the riff while the solo plays and what key its in?

Well, if E is a pedal note, it is probably the root note. You have to use the other notes to figure out what scale it actually is.
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.