#1
Yesterday, I got a Yamaha Pacifica 112v fairly cheap off ebay. It's from a local music shop, but the ebay part of the business is run separately.

Right the way up the neck, when picking hard, I'm getting buzz off the frets. When I pick a bit more softly (still perfectly audible, just a bit less) the buzz goes, and also when palm muting. Is this an issue, or is it relatively normal? I think most of the time I'll need to pick that hard I'll be playing quite loudly anyway, and probably with distortion on, so nobody else will hear it, but I'll be able to. Also, if I make a mistake and pick too hard when playing clean, it's going to buzz. The action's not particularly low, maybe about 2mm at the 12th fret on the low E. It's most noticeable on the bottom 3 strings, but on listening closely it is happening on the top 3 as well.

Is this something that's easy to fix, or should I take it to the shop for a setup? More importantly, can it be fixed, or is it a duff guitar?
#2
Getting a new nut helped my problem with fret buzz. But lot's of people here probably know more than me
#3
Quote by salgala2000
Getting a new nut helped my problem with fret buzz. But lot's of people here probably know more than me

Thanks. It's not a nut issue though, it happens when the strings are fretted.
#4
How's your truss rod? http://www.fretnotguitarrepair.com/trussrods.htm

If the neck has too much bow in either directions, it can cause fret buzz, even if your frets are correctly leveled and the saddles are set to the height where the action is where you want it to be.

But at first, you have to check out if the neck isn't warped or twisted.
#5
Quote by Tinderwet
How's your truss rod? http://www.fretnotguitarrepair.com/trussrods.htm

If the neck has too much bow in either directions, it can cause fret buzz, even if your frets are correctly leveled and the saddles are set to the height where the action is where you want it to be.

But at first, you have to check out if the neck isn't warped or twisted.

Sighting down the neck it looks completely straight. With a capo between the nut and fret 1 and pressing down at 22, there's a slight gap between the strings and frets around fret 6/7. The nearest I can measure it is using a 0.46mm pick, and it's smaller than this, but there is a definite gap there, so I'm thinking the truss rod won't make any difference.
#6
That sounds like the neck is pretty much straight, but when you're checking the gap, try to fret it at where the body starts supporting the neck instead of the very last fret, just to be sure. For your guitar it's probably around the 16th or 17th fret.

Anyway, at which frets does the buzz occur?
#7
Checked again at 16, pretty much the same, so it would appear the neck's fine.

I can make it buzz at every fret if I pick hard enough, but it's particularly noticeable between frets 4 and 9. It's pretty hard to make it happen before fret 3 and after fret 12. The A and D strings seems to be worst affected.
#8
First off ALL guitars will have fret buzz when plucked really hard (if the action isn't sky high). There simply isn't a whole hell of a lot of room for the string to vibrate before it will contact the crown of the next fret. You are noticing it worse on the lower strings because the larger the string the greater the oscillation pattern....obvious to the naked eye. I do all my own fretwork and know I've got perfectly level/crowned frets. I set my guitars at 1.6MM on the low E and can get each and every one of them to buzz by plucking hard.

Have you played other guitars with similar action and NOT experienced fret buzz with the same pick attack?

Have you changed the stock strings yet? It can really make a big difference sometimes...who knows how old they are (possible years).
#9
Try to give it some bow with the truss rod, so you have more gap. One quarter turn at a time, and let it settle for a few hours or even a day. If it doesn't improve and you don't want to raise your action higher, then I'm afraid only a proper fret leveling/crowning job will make it perfect.

Also, just to be clear, you measured the action from the bottom of the string to the top of the fret, right?
#10
Quote by Tinderwet
Also, just to be clear, you measured the action from the bottom of the string to the top of the fret, right?

Yeah, that's how I measured it.

I think I'll swap the strings out and then just play it for a while, see how it is. If I'm really not happy with it in a month or so, I'll take it in to be set up. I've got a 12 month warranty, so if it turns out that there is something wrong with it, I shouldn't have any problem getting my money back/a replacement.

I do normally play acoustic guitars, and the only other electric I've played for a significant time is a really really cheap one with an awful neck, so I don't really have anything to compare it to. This could easily be due to poor playing.

Thanks for the help.
#12
Changed the strings, problem gone. I'll definitely do that any time I get a new guitar from now on...
#13
^ Good to hear you fixed it. I'd just like to say though, that a small bit of acoustic (playing non-amplified) fret buzz on an electric is alright, as it won't come through the amp. It's when you hear it through the amp that you have issues. If you really have to whack the strings hard to hear the fret buzz, well, I'd consider that normal.
#14
Quote by Rokeman
^ Good to hear you fixed it. I'd just like to say though, that a small bit of acoustic (playing non-amplified) fret buzz on an electric is alright, as it won't come through the amp. It's when you hear it through the amp that you have issues. If you really have to whack the strings hard to hear the fret buzz, well, I'd consider that normal.

Yeah, I can get it to happen now, but I really do have to hit the strings hard. Before, I was having to play really quite softly to avoid it, so it was very easily to accidentally hit the strings slightly too hard and get a loud buzz. All fine now.