#1
A lot of songs that I really like aren't written in one key. For example Eight Days a Week uses the chords D, E, G, Bm, and A so the E major chord doesn't fit into any major key signature. Another example is Nutshell by Alice in Chains, the opening chord from that song is E, the rest of the chords are D, Cadd9, G and Em7 so once agian it's the E major chord that doesn't fit in.
What is this technique of using chords outside the key signature called? When you are writing a song in X key, how do you know what chords you can borrow from another key signature, or what other key signatures you can borrow from?
#2
Easiest way is try it and listen!
When altitude dropping, my ears started popping. One more red nightmare...
#5
often its the fifth of the fifth that doesnt fit the key
for example in the key of the C it would be D
because G is the fifth of C, and D is the fifth of G
hope that makes some sense
#6
A lot of songs use chords that are 5ths above other chords. For example a major II chord in a major song can lead to a V chord which then goes back to the I chord. II is a V of V chord. I'm guessing that is all that the E is. It's called secondary dominant.
#7
Great advise I was given and will pass on to you:

Music theory is NOT A SET OF RULES, it is a set of guidelines that help musicians understand why certain notes/intervals/chords/scales go together well. And just like every other type of art the most creative will always be the ones to think outside the box.
#8
The beatles song is probably in A, in which case, Emaj fits perfectly. Its very common also to have bVII so that explains the G.

Alice and chains doesnt really support your question because the E isnt really in the chord progression.

But to answer your question, 85/100 times, a chord thats out of key is a secondary dominant
#9
Quote by init24
often its the fifth of the fifth that doesnt fit the key
for example in the key of the C it would be D
because G is the fifth of C, and D is the fifth of G
hope that makes some sense

This is an easy way to modulate keys too.
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#10
Quote by hawk_kst
this is where theory can't help you...


theory can help you anywhere, but only if you really know it well.

i don't know the song, but the chords you gave make a lot of sense to me. the chords are Dmaj, Gmaj, Amaj, Emaj, and Bm, correct?

if the song is in D major (or B minor): Dmaj, Gmaj, Amaj, and Bm are diatonic, and Emaj is probably functioning as a secondary dominant (it could even be a non-functioning secondary dominant).

if the song is in A major: Amaj, Bm, Dmaj, and Emaj are diatonic, and Gmaj is the bVII borrowed from the parallel natural minor.

these are probably not the only examples, but again - i haven't heard the song. i'm not really a beatles fan.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#11
Quote by AeolianWolf
theory can help you anywhere, but only if you really know it well.

i don't know the song, but the chords you gave make a lot of sense to me. the chords are Dmaj, Gmaj, Amaj, Emaj, and Bm, correct?

if the song is in D major (or B minor): Dmaj, Gmaj, Amaj, and Bm are diatonic, and Emaj is probably functioning as a secondary dominant (it could even be a non-functioning secondary dominant).

if the song is in A major: Amaj, Bm, Dmaj, and Emaj are diatonic, and Gmaj is the bVII borrowed from the parallel natural minor.

these are probably not the only examples, but again - i haven't heard the song. i'm not really a beatles fan.
Listening to it, it sounds like it's in A major, which makes that rather simple.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
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#12
This is the most detailed analysis you'll find.
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.