#1
Anyone got any ideas? Can't get rid of that tinny, thin sound at the bridge pickup. Getting tired of having to roll off the volume I pretty much know nothing about the current pickup market, so would be very pleased if someone more knowledgeable could help me!

I want a single coil that can give the same sort of tones that John Frusciante has in songs like "If you have to ask". Really clean smooth sounds. But also be able to handle some overdrive and distortion on songs like "Good time boys"

Not really sure about the budget yet, so if you have any ideas of videos I'd be very grateful

Cheers guys
#3
There are rules against bumping your own threads...

For pickups just about anything is going to have a fatter tone then the stock mexi strat pickups. Look for something wound to around 6K to 8K with alnico 5 magnets. To make a more specific recomendation we need to know what amp you are using.
#4
Quote by CorduroyEW
There are rules against bumping your own threads...

For pickups just about anything is going to have a fatter tone then the stock mexi strat pickups. Look for something wound to around 6K to 8K with alnico 5 magnets. To make a more specific recomendation we need to know what amp you are using.

A DSL 401 combo. Thanks
Last edited by JDRM at May 28, 2010,
#6
Quote by CorduroyEW
And you are just after after a bridge pickup or a full set?

I'll only buy a bridge at first (lack of money). Is it a good idea to mix pickup types for the different positions? Is there a certain type of bridge pickup that sounds the best and the same for the middle and neck?
#7
In that case I'm going to recommend something that isn't exactly what Fru uses. Fru uses a slightly overwound 62 style pickup. These pickups use 42awg heavy formvar wire, alnico 5 magnets, and fibre bobbins. In the neck and middle positions this gives a very warm sounding tone but in the bridge it tends to sound quite thin. If you listen to the times when fru uses his bridge pickup he is either doing one of his super thin, clean, funk rhythms or he is using lots of FX which fill out the midrange for a warmer thicker tone. Because you, obviously, don't want to sound thin I'm going to recommend something that sounds more like what people expect the clean tone to be based on his dirty bridge tone.

You want something with the same basic components as the 62 pickup but you want it wound hotter so that it can fill out the midrange. The bridge version of the John Mayer big dipper pickup is wound to around 7.5K (ish) which is a little on the weak side for what you are after but it would work. Trouble is this isn't an aftermarket pickup so you would have to find it on ebay. Seymour Duncan used to make an 8K formvar bridge pickup but I'm not sure if he still does. It was called the california set. Only easy way I know of to get a pickup like this is to get it from me. My hot Texan is wound to around 9.5K and really does a good job of giving you the vintage fender tone with a bit more depth in the midrange. I also make a 7.5K formvar pickup called the CEW but I think my hot Texan will work better for you.
#9
The Fender noiseless single coil pickups don't sound very much like real single coil pickups. To make matters worse they are built to emulate the sounds of the late 60's rather than the early 60's so they are more twangy and have less low end than what you are looking for. If you did get noiseless singles the only ones I could recommend would be the ones made by chris Kinman but again, those emulate late 60's tone, not early 60's tone. I don't know of anybody who makes a noiseless single that even tries to emulate early 60's tone.

As you look around, it's important that your pickup uses Formvar wire. If the pickups don't use formvar wire then they aren't going to give you the type of sound you are after. Also beware of companies that advertise formvar but don't really use it. They tend to use terms like "formvar PE" or "accurate formvar" to describe their products rather than just saying formvar.
Last edited by CorduroyEW at May 31, 2010,
#11
Quote by JDRM
Great, thanks! I'll carry on my research. Thanks for all your help


buy the pickup from him. CorduroyEW really knows a lot about pickups and sells his own pickups, rockmonkey pickups.
Guitars
Fender American Standard Strat 2008
Burny late 1980's Super Grade RLG-70 Les Paul
Sterling by Musicman JP50
Fender Classic Series 60's tele
Yamaha FS720S
Amp
Roland Microcube
Fender Blues Junior III Humholdt
#12
What do you guys think about the SSL-1. John uses them in his 55 and his 61.
The SSL 4 also sounds pretty sweet. I think i'm leaning towards the ssl4 as it's quite important to me to be able to get a good crunchy dirty tone as well as a clean surf one. What do yo think?
#13
I'm not sure if he uses SSL-1 is his strats. I thought he uses the original pickups that came with the guitar. But the SSL-1 in neck and middle and SSL-5 in bridge is a good set.
Guitars
Fender American Standard Strat 2008
Burny late 1980's Super Grade RLG-70 Les Paul
Sterling by Musicman JP50
Fender Classic Series 60's tele
Yamaha FS720S
Amp
Roland Microcube
Fender Blues Junior III Humholdt
#14
There is a rumor floating around that says that a couple of fru's guitars that were damaged in his famous house fire had the pickups replaced with SSL-1 pickups but I find that hard to believe and have only seen it on message boards and wiki which are compleatly unreliable. Other rumours, that I find much more believable, say that he had duncan wind him a custom shop set that was the similar in spec as the SS1 but hand wound by duncan himself. Then again others say that all his guitars still have their original pickups. He has a heck of a lot of 62 strats and I believe most of them still have the original pickups but it would not surprise me if at least a couple of his guitars to have something hand wound from the Duncan custom shop. Given that Fru tone is one of the most sought after tones from strats at the moment I find it hard to believe that duncan wouldn't list him among the people that use the SS1 if he actually used the SS1.

The SS1 is a pretty good pickup. It's going to to a great job of giving you funky thin bridge tones but because of the natural scooped midrange of this pickup combined with the lack of bass provided by the bridge position, it means if you want anything other than thin tone you are going to have to use a lot of FX. I'm not saying it's a thin pickup in general, it's only thin in the bridge and that is in keeping with the vintage 62 design.

I think the SS1 is a good pickup that would be great if it were hand wound.
#15
From Vintage Guitar magazine
Have you kept the original pickups in your Strats? Here's his reply: I would like to, but they do eventually need to be changed. On my '55, I bought it with an expert who insisted we open it up to see if the pickups were original. He and the people at the store all thought that they were original. Then years later, we found out that they were Seymour Duncan Vintage Strat pickups. They are so similar to the original that it's hard to tell the difference in sound. I had my '62, which has the original pickups, and then I had the '55 with the Duncans, and the sound was very similar. The differences had more to do with the guitars than the pickups. Eventually, I had to get Duncans in the '62 as well.


I'm quite liking the idea of having an SS1 in Neck and mid, and a SS5 in bridge. What do you think Corduroy?
#16
Quote by JDRM
From Vintage Guitar magazine


I'm quite liking the idea of having an SS1 in Neck and mid, and a SS5 in bridge. What do you think Corduroy?


He says Duncans but he doesn't say the SSL-1. It could be the Antiquities model or a custom shop model.
Guitars
Fender American Standard Strat 2008
Burny late 1980's Super Grade RLG-70 Les Paul
Sterling by Musicman JP50
Fender Classic Series 60's tele
Yamaha FS720S
Amp
Roland Microcube
Fender Blues Junior III Humholdt
#17
^^that's more info than I had seen before. I did know that the 62's had original pickups a few years back but I guess thats changed. I still doubt that it's the SS1 that is in those guitars and I'm willing to bet that it's a custom shop or antiquity pickup. Those get hand wound while the SS1 doesn't. Hand winding a 62 style and then using the right potting methods and magnet aging can easily give you tone that is authentic like fru is talking about in the article.

The SS5 is kind of a twangy pickup when on full throttle and is much more open and balanced when you use the tap. I think that a pickup that used formvar wire would be better, but as far as versatility and thickness is concerned the SS5 isn't a bad choice and for fru tone neck and middle you could do a lot worse than the SS1. I still think that my handwound pickups would searve you better than the standard Duncan pickups but I realize that price is probably a factor along with the fact that I'm a very small boutique company.