#1
i've been working on my theory lately ('bout time i'd say) and i have notied my impov isn't as shit as it used to be, what i don't get is how the ell dos a few scales help this?
can someone please explain this for me?
#2
Because music is build around them?
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#3
Quote by 08L1V10N
Because music is build around them?


.........couldn't have said it better myself..........
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#4
alrighty, how many scales are there?

EDIT: sorry i'm just completely retarded when it comes to theory.
Last edited by thamason69 at May 27, 2010,
#5
Quote by thamason69
alrighty, how many scales are there?

There are a HUGE amount of different scales.
The most common ones you'll encounter are:
Major
Minor (Natural, Harmonic, occasionally Melodic)
Pentatonic
Blues
Chromatic

This site has quite a few scales on it.
http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/guitar_scales.php
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Who's going to stop you? The music police?
Last edited by FacetOfChaos at May 27, 2010,
#6
Because you now have a guide that shows you which set of notes sound good. Especially the pentatonic scale, because it is almost impossible to hit dissonant notes.
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#8
Quote by thamason69
and what one's do you's think i should focus on learning first?

The ones that I said above. Learn the Major scale first and then it's probably easiest to remember how the other scales are altered from the major scale as that's how a lot of scales are written.

For example:
C major - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
C natural minor - 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7

That means that C natural minor has lowered 3rd, 6th, and 7th scale degrees compared to C major.

So learn the Major scale, Minor scales (At least Natural and Harmonic), and the pentatonic.
Depends what type of music you're playing but those are the most common.
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Who's going to stop you? The music police?
Last edited by FacetOfChaos at May 27, 2010,
#11
I reccomend you learn the minor pentatonic first, all the notes are basically safe and it's VERY easy to spend hours jamming on it.
Call me Batman.
#12
Quote by thamason69
i've been working on my theory lately ('bout time i'd say) and i have notied my impov isn't as shit as it used to be, what i don't get is how the ell dos a few scales help this?
can someone please explain this for me?


No, I think you should learn to find these answers yourself. Music isn't a Vending machine where you throw a little effort and receive instant gratification. Time, Patience, Commitment and Practice. If you have to ask how it helps, it sounds like we are put in the position of "talking you into it".

I'm sure no one wants to do that. You're in charge of your own musical destiny. Find these answers for yourself. Show that you respect music and the fact that it takes work and time and go out there and make it happen.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at May 27, 2010,
#15
Yeah, start with the major scale. Be able to find your root note on every string and once you can do that, start learning interval relationships with each root note. And always keep jamming.

Edit: Once you learn the major scale, all other scales will be like cake since they are mostly derived from and described in relation to the major scale. All the new scales will require is a simple adjustment of intervals, not an entire new memorization of a huge pattern (which is what things seem like at first).
Oh yeah.

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EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
Last edited by hockeyplayer168 at May 27, 2010,