#1
1. I noticed my soloing is so plain. And sucks. I just started and I understand the concepts it's just I have no improvisation technique and I have ideas but I can't find intervals that go not just good but great together. Any suggestions? I would like to shred all over the fretboard and I realize I have to learn my notes and scales. It's so hard learning every note all along the fretboard and no to mention learning a drop tuning...

2. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=012UlEi_0uo&feature=youtube_gdata
When I saw this I inspired me. I can do so much on an acoustic, I just don't know it yet. Anyways, how would you harmonize the melodies and harmonizies of 2 guitars? And how do you know what chords to play due to their both playing 2 chords but differently. I read a little of Cornwoids harmonizing but I don't want to learn the history and about vocals. I couldn't tell you anyhig about vocals I can't sing or nothing.

#2
1. I wouldn't really worry about the drop tunings much. Aside from that, your ability to improvise will get better with practice. Make sure you don't get ahead of the "music in your head" when you jam or your playing will drop off and your practice will lose its productivity.

2. Ever heard of Tenacious D? lol
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#3
1) Work with only a few notes at first. Then spread out. If you can't make a melody from 3 or 4 notes, don't worry about alternate tunings yet.

2) Learn to write one part at a time, then worry about 2 working together.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#4
Quote by The_Sophist
1) Work with only a few notes at first. Then spread out. If you can't make a melody from 3 or 4 notes, don't worry about alternate tunings yet.

2) Learn to write one part at a time, then worry about 2 working together.


b2) thanks. But do any chords go together? I want to learn to harmonize my melodies.
#5
Quote by cj_lespaul
b2) thanks. But do any chords go together? I want to learn to harmonize my melodies.


forget this I read a few lessons that simplify it instead of go into detail like Cornwoid(good lesson though)
#6
1. If by intervals you are talking about what sounds good when double stopping or whatever, look at what makes a consonant and a dissonant interval. octaves, thirds, fifths, and sixths or consonant (sound nice) and the rest or dissonant (not so nice but, if used right could sound great!)

Look at chord tones and really mold your soloing over what is happening behind you. Ideally someone should be able to hear what kind of bass line you have in your head without you actually having any backing.

2. Chords that sound good together are usually either two different voicings of the same chord or one base chord and the other extensions. As said above, look at what makes a consanant and dissonant interval. Also look at all your key signatures and and know your major scale inside out, upside down and sideways, as well as how to make chords from it and your primary chords and what they are used for.