#1
Is there a right way to fingerpick? Like I've heard people say to use your thumb for the top three strings, index finger for G string, middle finger for B string, and ring finger for e string. Is this how most people do it?
#2
I think that's a pretty decent way to do it. I'm unorthodox though in that I rarely use my index finger. Not sure why I developed that way.
#4
i don't like the idea of using a certain finger for each string. just develop the technique so that it is natural, fluid, and adaptable.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#5
just be sure to use your thumb ¡, index middle and ring finers, the pinky can rest. but make sure to make al scales with you ring, middle and index fingers. in that order

r,m,i,r,m,i,r,m,i... and so on
#6
Technically, OP got the "correct" classical approach in his post. Like, if you go to professionally study classical guitar, you'll follow that strict approach and technique.
But I guess in a more modern sense, you can adapt that as you see fit. Like, I rarely use my ring finger, but you'd never be able to tell by listening to the music.

Most important thing I can suggest is to work your thumb, and work it WELL. It will really get you a lot further in fingerpicking than focusing on anything else
Quote by sporkman7
so what wierd things can u guys do? no not like laser vision or meat vision or something, but like random stuff that usually comes in handy
#7
Technically, OP got the "correct" classical approach in his post. Like, if you go to professionally study classical guitar, you'll follow that strict approach and technique.


0.o

You know, I don't think it's quite as simple as the OP outlined.

There's lots of different methods but one thing that's always important is that the plucking motion comes from the first knuckle (where the finger joins the palm) and that it moves INTO the hand.
#8
Quote by nedthehead
Technically, OP got the "correct" classical approach in his post. Like, if you go to professionally study classical guitar, you'll follow that strict approach and technique.
But I guess in a more modern sense, you can adapt that as you see fit. Like, I rarely use my ring finger, but you'd never be able to tell by listening to the music.

Most important thing I can suggest is to work your thumb, and work it WELL. It will really get you a lot further in fingerpicking than focusing on anything else



No, that is NOT "correct" classical approach. That is a guideline and a guideline only, alot of the repertoire will call for the AMI fingers playing the bass strings and the thumb playing the treble strings and all sorts of different combinations. You will NOT follow that strict approach if you go study it professionally. You will only use it as a guide when you're starting out but after that, you use logical fingerings.


TS, if you're looking for the best way to fingerpick in terms of tone, projection, clarity and efficiency, take a look at some books intended for classical guitarists. Scott Tenant's Pumping Nylon is an excellent book overall for all guitarists. It basically covers every technique you will ever need to know. You don't even have to learn classical guitar, it's just a great book to learn how to finger pick properly.
#9
I think a better approach would be to mostly play the bass notes with your thumb, and let your other fingers take care of the rest. Using only your thumb for the bottom three strings could get awkward if you're playing melodies on those strings.