#1
Played a gig the other day with a 40w valve amp and the sound guy suggested I mic my amp up which I agreed was a good idea since it was quite a large gig.

However, he kept insisting that I turn the volume on my amp lower and lower, to the point where i couldn't actually hear it from where i was standing (and apparently the audience couldn't hear it all that well either). He just kept insisting that i turn down no matter what I said.

It wasn't like the amp was unreasonably loud either. I eventually just told him to turn the microphone off and i just turned the amp way up; everyone agreed the sound was much better after i did this.

Anyone had a similar experience to this? What kind of volume would you expect to be playing at? In this case i might as well have just used my five watt amp rather than borrowing a 40w amp off of my friend.
THIS IS THE JAPANESE KABUKI ROCK!!!!
Ibanez RG1550 w/ BKP nailbombs
Aria Magna series w/ Dimarzio SD
Blackstar HT 5
Fender FM210R
Ibanez DE7
Keeley/Boss BD2
Line 6 floor pod
#2
I haven't, but that's really stupid. Your amp is loud enough by itself, the advantage of micing it would be to spread the sound more evenly, so it should be coming out of the pa at about the same volume as it's coming out of your amp
#3
Whenever i play gigs, i always whack up my volume to about mid way on my 75watt amp. That usually does the trick so i can hear my amp, and everyone in the crowd can hear it louder. I think its just a picky sound guy that doesn't really know what he's doing.
#4
I must say I don't have much experince micing amps, so I might be wrong but I think I got an idea.

If your five watt amp gives you the tone you need and you intend on micing it for at gig, then by all means use it.

About the annoying sound guy I got a littel confused but I think I know what the sound guy meant to do. I think he wanted you to keep the volume of the amp relatively low so he could ramp up the volume on the PA system instead. It would make sense to make sure that the people nearest the stage wasn't getting sound from both the PA and your amp.

Why the audience couldn't hear anything I don't but maybe he simply screwed up with the PA system somehow.

I must stress again that I am far from an expert on this.
#5
Quote by im_bored
I haven't, but that's really stupid. Your amp is loud enough by itself, the advantage of micing it would be to spread the sound more evenly, so it should be coming out of the pa at about the same volume as it's coming out of your amp

this.

it's really stupid to insist that the guitarist turn his amp down so low that it can't be heard on stage. because more volume from the guitar amp is actually beneficial to a certain extent when you're miking everything up:

1. Simply putting a microphone next to something isn't going to make the microphone pick that up if it's so much quieter than everything else in the room - you're gonna end up getting ambience from everything else in the signal, often louder than what you're trying to mic up, if it's that quiet.
2. If you mic up a quiet sound you're gonna have to boost a mic further to get it balanced in the mix - more boost = more likelihood of feedback. Combine that with what i just said in point 1, and you've got a complete mess
3. A strong signal from a guitar amp being put into a microphone is good so long as you're not overpowering the mic with it. You'll need much, MUCH less gain on the mic because the sound its picking up will be louder, and because you're using less gain you'll get less ambience from the room and less of the drum kit overpowering the guitar amp because it won't be overpowering it in the room.

That's probably not the best way to explain it but that sound guy should not be working, and i certainly hope he's not getting paid to do that much of a bad job.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#6
Just sounds like a bad sound tech.

I had a similar experience during a soundcheck. So afterwards I went to my dad (he's been a DJ for 40 years, so knows what he's talking about) and he reckoned I was too quiet compared to the backing guitar and needed to come up. So when I got on stage, I just gave my amp a cheeky boost and whenever I felt quiet just kicked in my boost pedal.
Ibanez PGM301
Ibanez GRG170DX
Fender Telecaster MiJ - 1986
Swing T-Through

Ibanez TS9DX
Sovtek Small Stone - c.1985
EHX Big Muff
Kimbara Wah - c.1974
Boss GE-7

Orange Rocker 30 Combo

http://www.myspace.com/paythelay
#7
I usually have my amp loud enough to where I can hear it and my sound guy adjusts it in the PA system so that everyone can hear it.
Slappa tha bass
#8
I get this out of sound men alot. Most of them understand that you have to have some volume out of your amp to keep the tubes happy but a few others just do not get it. It is a big balancing act to get the volume you need and want from the amp without washing everyone else in the mix out and keeping the stage monitors from feeding back. Experience shows!
7 string Legion 7 > 6 Do mosh pits warm your heart? Then become a SECOND RATE CITIZEN.....better than the worst!
#9
Having been a sound guy and long-time gigging guitarist I can see it from both sides.

The biggest problem is when guitarists put their amps (especially small combo amps) on the floor of the stage. Since your ears aren't on your ankles you turn up your amp more and more in an effort to hear it. The end result is all that volume is going through your legs out into the audience and screwing up the sound-guy's mix.

The idea with micing is it offers a better dispersion of the sound through both sides of the PA speakers as opposed to a fairly narrow dispersion from your amp.

What you need to do is have your amp at ear-level to enable you to hear it better - get a speaker stand/amp stand or stack some milk crates etc., that way you can hear more guitar at lower volume.

Some sound guys are still douches though.
#10
Quote by miketheslut
I get this out of sound men alot. Most of them understand that you have to have some volume out of your amp to keep the tubes happy but a few others just do not get it.


This. I've played with god knows how many different guys doing sound, and they always look at you with 2 heads when you insist that, essentially, louder is better.

Got so fed up, I'm now saving for an attenuator
#11
Quote by AlexAngus
Having been a sound guy and long-time gigging guitarist I can see it from both sides.

The biggest problem is when guitarists put their amps (especially small combo amps) on the floor of the stage. Since your ears aren't on your ankles you turn up your amp more and more in an effort to hear it. The end result is all that volume is going through your legs out into the audience and screwing up the sound-guy's mix.

The idea with micing is it offers a better dispersion of the sound through both sides of the PA speakers as opposed to a fairly narrow dispersion from your amp.

What you need to do is have your amp at ear-level to enable you to hear it better - get a speaker stand/amp stand or stack some milk crates etc., that way you can hear more guitar at lower volume.

Some sound guys are still douches though.


I usually put it on top of another amp if I'm not headlining, and if I am, I just put it on my guitar cases. Hiscox Liteflite's make for great stands!
Ibanez PGM301
Ibanez GRG170DX
Fender Telecaster MiJ - 1986
Swing T-Through

Ibanez TS9DX
Sovtek Small Stone - c.1985
EHX Big Muff
Kimbara Wah - c.1974
Boss GE-7

Orange Rocker 30 Combo

http://www.myspace.com/paythelay