#1
Guys what exactly is the difference between a FR tremolo like you might find on a DK2 and a PRS tremolo? Please informed answers only.
Mesa Boogie Single Rectifier

Jackson DKMG

Hot Rodded Telecaster


"of course he`s egotistical we`re all egotistical if we weren`t we`d be bassists."

Alter Bridge Pearl Jam Foo Fighters 3 Doors Down
#2
FR tremolos are basically overbuilt and made to handle anything you can throw at them without going out of tune. you can abuse them as much as you want and you have the knowledge that your strings won't slip out of tune. a PRS tremolo is somewhere between a strat style and a FR. it can do some pretty solid stuff, but wont do your steve vai divebombs or stuff like that. that'll make it slip out of tune.

that being said, i'll take a PRS tremolo over a FR any day. i dont need to go crazy, i just need a little emphasis on notes here and there. FR in my opinion is too much of a hastle with string changes (not hard or anything, just time consuming) and you cant change up tunings on the fly like you can with a non locking tremolo.
#3
The vibrato that PRS guitars use is a traditional style of vibrato, like you get on Fender Stratocasters. The PRS version is an updated, better made design of course, but in the end it serves the same function. A Floyd is quite a different beast, working on a two post pivot system and locking the strings at both the bridge saddles and at either the nut (most comon) or the tuners (less common but not unheard of). Most Floyds are installed 'recessed', meaning there is a space routed out underneath it so that it can be pulled upwards as well as pushed down, giving you the option of raising the pitch. Since a Floyd is balanced against the string tension, it is very easy to move the bar up and down, although this also means that double stop techniques such as unison bends become impossible to play in tune as the moment you bend one string, the other five strings will be pulled out of tune since the Floyd bridge moves so easily. With a PRS vibrato (or any other similar non-locking, traditional vibrato) the spring tension is usually increased past the string tension, so the arm is stiffer to move - the advanatge of this is it also takes more tension on the strings to make the bridge move, so you can usually bend a string manually without the others going out of tune as the added tension of simply bending a string isn't enough to make the stiffer PRS bridge shift. Since a traditional vibrato is almost always installed flat against the top of the body (non-floating/non-recessed) you can't pull up to raise the pitch but you do get better sustain and more natural tone from it.

tl;dr version: They're very different. If you want to dive bomb and pull up and all that jazz, you need a floating Floyd but be aware they come with just as many disadvantages as advantages. If you want more subtle vibrato or you only want to dive occasionally, the PRS or Fender style of vibrato will be fine.
Yes, I know everything. No, I can't play worth a damn.
A child is trafficked and sold for sex slavery every 30 seconds. Support Love146.
#4
So a PRS will not allow you to raise the pitch of a note only lower it?
Mesa Boogie Single Rectifier

Jackson DKMG

Hot Rodded Telecaster


"of course he`s egotistical we`re all egotistical if we weren`t we`d be bassists."

Alter Bridge Pearl Jam Foo Fighters 3 Doors Down
#6
I would but I am rather far away from a music store with any variety in guitars.
Mesa Boogie Single Rectifier

Jackson DKMG

Hot Rodded Telecaster


"of course he`s egotistical we`re all egotistical if we weren`t we`d be bassists."

Alter Bridge Pearl Jam Foo Fighters 3 Doors Down
#7
Quote by SilentFactor
So a PRS will not allow you to raise the pitch of a note only lower it?

It will, just about a full note up. It depends on how you set the trem up.

also the PRS trem is a direct bolt on to a strat 6 point bridge.

i prefer the prs bridge over a floyd. but i don't need to make horse noises with a trem, others do.
I wondered why the frisbee was getting bigger, then it hit me.