#1
Hey! I just got a new guitar, an ibanez rgd320wh ( yes, the new one ) and it is factory tuned in D standard. Now the problem is that it isn't exactly in D nor in C#.. it is in between both and I want it to be in D ..BUT when trying to tune it with the fine tuners, they reach the limit and I can't go on. HEEELP! What should I do? Should I set the fine tuners half the way, unscrew the locking tuners and tune it normally? Would that mess with the bridge?? Please, help
Gear:
*Ibanez TBX150H 150w Head
*Ibanez IS412CA angled cabinet
*Boss MT-2 Metal Zone
*Boss BF-3 Flanger
*Ibanez WD7 Weeping Demon Wah
*MXR Carbon Copy Delay
*Squier by Fender Stratocaster
*Jackson Randy Rhoads RR1 (Made in India)
#2
If you reach the limit of the fine-tuners at the bridge, yes you have to unscrew the locking nut(if there is one) and tune at the headstock.

Were you looking for some shortcut or way to get around the design of the locking tremolo system?

It's called a non-locking nut.

It's also called the reason I'll never own a guitar like that on purpose.
#3
unlock the nut, move all the fine tuners to about thier middle position. Then tune it up at the head stock.

Remember that when u change one strings tension, all the others compensate for it.

Eg. Tune up the low E, ADGBE go flat.

There's heaps of forums around that teach you how to set up ur ibanez. And really, it's not that much of a hassle, once it's set up you don't have to change it for like a month, then it might be slightly out of tune, then use the fine tuners to fix it up.

The guy above makes it sound like a major pain in the arse, but it really isn't that bad. Just remember when u change the pitch of one string, you must go back to the low string and tune all the strings up again. AND MAKE SURE YOU STRETCH YOUR STINGS BEFORE YOU LOCK THE NUT. Otherwise you'll have to keep on opening the nut to tune.
- Ibanez S470 (2004)
- late 70's vintage Fender Stratocaster (USA)
- VOX VT100 Amp
- Digitech Whammy Pedal
- Weeping Demon Wah Pedal
- Visual Sound Volume Pedal
- MXR Micro Amp
#4
One thing to do is to set the fine-tuners halfway, and then tune again. You can make it easier by tuning it like EeABDG (the strings of course, the notes in D). Tune the opposite string, pretty much. Go through that process several times until it's in the general area of the note you want. Then lock it up and use the fine-tuners.
#5
Quote by schwinginbatman
One thing to do is to set the fine-tuners halfway, and then tune again. You can make it easier by tuning it like EeABDG (the strings of course, the notes in D). Tune the opposite string, pretty much. Go through that process several times until it's in the general area of the note you want. Then lock it up and use the fine-tuners.


I find it better to have it in tune before locking up, then fine tune it after i lock it, but either way works, it's just mine involves moving the fine tuners less.
- Ibanez S470 (2004)
- late 70's vintage Fender Stratocaster (USA)
- VOX VT100 Amp
- Digitech Whammy Pedal
- Weeping Demon Wah Pedal
- Visual Sound Volume Pedal
- MXR Micro Amp
#6
just dont get guitars with lockjing nuts. problem solved you are probably going to have to do this a lot because the string stretch when they're new.
#7
as said set the fine tuners halfway, unlock the nut tune and stretch your strings repeatedly, check the bridge is parrallel to the body, check the intonation, retune , lock the nut, fine tune.

as a final thought on a common mistake with FR/Edge trems make sure the strings are locked into the bridge properly as that will definatly screw your tuning.
Last edited by ibanezgod1973 at May 30, 2010,
#8
Quote by FIamingo
just dont get guitars with lockjing nuts. problem solved you are probably going to have to do this a lot because the string stretch when they're new.

Bullocks, and this is the kind of talk that makes people avoid floating bridges. People who don't have as clue about how one really works and should be set up, should be denied the privilege of even talking about it, I think.
If you knew anything about guitars at all you'd have the common sense to know how this is not true.

To the TS, find a good guide (like the one on the top of this forum), and stick to it, go through all the steps like a bible, and you should be able to get it to where you want in no time. and remember, every time will make it easier!
Last edited by Y00p at May 30, 2010,
#9
Quick tip.. If set up properly, strings on a FR-style bridge, when they do go out of tune, tend to go flat from stretching (if they go sharp for some reason it's usually not by much) so set the fine tuners more towards the high side before tuning and locking. That way when a string falls flat you'll have more room to fine tune back to pitch before you have to unlock the nut and use the real tuners.