#1
Which recording equipment should I buy?

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Alright, I hope this is posted in the right area if not someone point me in the right direction.

So I am looking into getting some recording equipment. I have went to a music store and talked with some sales people and they recommended Digidesign MBOX 2, Apex SP1 basic studio pack, KRK RP6-G2 speakers as they have better quality sound for $$$ amount and possibly some headphones. (Plus cords and stuff)

Now is the gear they recommended good quality, and enough to last a beginner at recording a while, while still having all the capabilities. My budget is around $800.

Thanks for any info!!!!!!!!!
#2
You're headed off on the right track. Here are my thoughts on everything:

Digidesign Mbox 2 - Great choice for an interface IMO. Yes, its way more expensive than most other interfaces out there but well worth it. I've been using one for about 2 years now and its served itself well. Pro Tools LE is a great piece of software with a lot of great effects, plugins and virtual instruments. There are a few downsides to it though. First off, the Mbox only has 2 inputs so recording drums well is out of the question. Also, Pro Tools doesn't have support for VST plugins out of the box. There is a program out there for $100 that lets you convert VST plugins so they work in Pro Tools thats well worth the money.

Get the Mbox 2? Yes, if you can, get the Mbox 2 Factory cuz you get a lot of extra goodies

Apex SP1 - I've never heard of Apex or their mics so I did a little google action to see what I could find. It looks like a solid package. I didn't find any terrible reviews for it. Actually, most were pretty positive. It looks like a pretty solid set.

Get the Apex SP1 set? It looks like a good set. The one thing I'd probably recommend different is the Rode NT1-A. Its only one mic but its a great mic you can throw in front of anything. Also, if you plan on micing a guitar amp, I'd get a Dynamic mic like a Shure SM57 or Sennheiser e609.

KRK Rockit 6s - When my buddies and I were looking at studio monitors, we went to an independent music shop in our area. My buddy was convinced on buying a pair of mackies since all he had heard was that Mackie was the best. The guy laughs and says listen to these bad boys. He walks us into a room with about 12 different pairs of monitor speakers ranging from $100 M-Audio speakers up to $800 Mackie & KRK speakers. After listening to an audio loop playing back through the different sets, it was pretty much unanimous that the KRK has the best sound out of all of them.

Get the KRKs? Yes, Very Yes!

Anything else you need right away? Probably not but there is a lot you should get down the line. But we'll get into that later
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#3
Just had a question on what the VST plug ins are? A little description would help alot. Thanks for taking the time Lockwolf I really appreciate it and hopefully will be getting some recording done in the near future!
#4
Quote by soapwarrior
Just had a question on what the VST plug ins are? A little description would help alot. Thanks for taking the time Lockwolf I really appreciate it and hopefully will be getting some recording done in the near future!


No Prob

There are 3 main types of plugins, there are RTAS, VST and AU. RTAS is the format that all Pro Tools effects plugins must be. Its a proprietary system designed by Digidesign for Pro Tools. VST is a more open structure that is designed by Steinberg (creators of Cubase) that is very open and pretty much every recording program except Pro Tools has support for them. There are thousands of free VST plugins ranging from compressors to delays & reverb to guitar amp sims and everything else. AU is pretty much the same as VST except more specialized for Mac systems.

Heres why it kinda matters. Since you're only limited to RTAS plugins in Pro Tools, you've gotta pay a little extra for them. There also isn't as big of market for independent and free RTAS plugins since its not as open as VST.

The good news is that there is a program that lets you convert VST plugins to RTAS so that you may use them within Pro Tools. Its developed by FXpansion and it works quite well. When I got it, I downloaded about 30 different VST plugins from various sources and only one of them didn't work well. Its well worth the extra $100 for the program to convert them.
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#6
i'd go with it all. if you do, the best advice i can toss out there is this...

learn everything you can about protools, read the manual, look in the help section, watch youtube videos, ask people who know it to show you stuff. it's a killer program (the best for audio in my opinion... and yes, i have good reasons for that and have compared it to a number of other high end programs) but there's so much to it, it'll be overwhelming at first. you gotta dig deep. the more you understand it the more you can do with it and have better chances of getting better results.
#7
Quote by sandyman323
i'd go with it all. if you do, the best advice i can toss out there is this...

learn everything you can about protools, read the manual, look in the help section, watch youtube videos, ask people who know it to show you stuff. it's a killer program (the best for audio in my opinion... and yes, i have good reasons for that and have compared it to a number of other high end programs) but there's so much to it, it'll be overwhelming at first. you gotta dig deep. the more you understand it the more you can do with it and have better chances of getting better results.


Truer words have never been said.

If you do end up getting an Mbox, grab the DVD that comes with it and watch it. You'll learn everything you need to start recording and making a good sounding track
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#8
Will do folks, I imagine it wil be a huge learning curve; but thats not a bad thing just means there are more capabilities. Thanks for everyones input.