#1
What chords, and intervals give a very sad or dark tone harmonized by a Cminor scale? I want some chords you wouldn't really hear like a 9th or something and also I would like to create the most tension for an emotional feel so I can resolve it.
#2
I dunno, especially since it's not the chord or the scale or the interval that makes the sound, but the instrumentation, effects, and tension/resolution that gives a song a "dark" feeling.

Play with things like delay, reverb, echo... these, I feel, when used properly, will add a ton of tension to songs.
#3
Thanks I'll play around with that. Can I add a tritone stacked to a chord even though it's not in the scale?
#5
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Who's to stop you? The Music police?


thanks that's inspirational and a new quote


can I also solo in melodic or harmonic minor if I'm in Cminor? Would it be out of key or sound bad?
#6
Quote by cj_lespaul
thanks that's inspirational and a new quote


can I also solo in melodic or harmonic minor if I'm in Cminor? Would it be out of key or sound bad?

C Melodic/Harmonic minor would be the most logical/best choice since, well, they're based off of the C Minor scale.

For the both the C Harmonic/Melodic minor you could use them over the V but for Melodic Minor, since it also has the nat 6, you could use it over the IV, as well. This is the simplest way to use them.
#7
It doesn't really matter what key you're playing, any techniques you use note wise will carry over to any other key. As for what you're asking trying using a cadence borrowing the dominant chord from the major scale back to the tonic, which would fit in the harmonic minor scale. Try a progression like this - Cm - Ab - Fm - G
#8
Quote by Wiegenlied
It doesn't really matter what key you're playing, any techniques you use note wise will carry over to any other key. As for what you're asking trying using a cadence borrowing the dominant chord from the major scale back to the tonic, which would fit in the harmonic minor scale. Try a progression like this - Cm - Ab - Fm - G


You don't have to borrow the major chord V, its harmonised from the harmonic and melodic minor scales. Both of which are diatonic to a minor key anyway.
#9
Can I borrow a chord from the relative key? Instead of a minor this make it a major that?
#10
Quote by cj_lespaul
Can I borrow a chord from the relative key? Instead of a minor this make it a major that?

If you are borrowing from a relative key, wouldn't that probably mean you never left the original key?
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#11
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Who's to stop you? The Music police?

*sirens blaring... car pulls off to the side of the road*
"excuse me sir, you know why i stopped you today? well i saw you driving along then heard that you were listening to a song that contains stacked tritones and we can't have that. can i see your license and registration please?... "
#12
Quote by hockeyplayer168
If you are borrowing from a relative key, wouldn't that definitely mean you never left the original key?
Fixed.

TS, I think you mean "parallel" key, not "relative" key. Relative keys share the same notes, parallel keys share the same root.

And if that is what you meant to ask, then YES!! Borrowing chords from the parallel minor is very, very common.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea