#1
Howdy UG,

I've decided to sell my 6262 212 combo, and upgrade to a 6262 with a 212 cab. The reason why I've decided this is because as a combo, it weighs a fair amount and where my band practices is very unforgiving to heavy and large objects, steep stairs and narrow corridors.

I've got a few questions regarding Avatar cabs;

1. Are they heavy?

2. I'm looking at the G212H set with V30's, is that a good idea (I play stuff along the lines of Parkway Drive, I Killed The Prom Queen, As I Lay Dying, Killswitch Engaged. All the core stuff).

3. Durable? And would a 6262 head work well with them?

I'm a noob when it comes to stacks, so please don't be too harsh.

Also, I live in Australia, so if there are any brands like Avatar or such which are relatively cheap, please inform me.

Thanks in advance.
ESP Horizon NT-II
Schecter Hellraiser C-1
Peavey 6505
Orange PPC412
Maxon OD808
ISP Decimator G-String
Boss TU3
#2
Too many times I hear guitarists complain about weight. Yes, if the ohms match, up it will sound good. There is a guy by the name of Mtuck on YT that does VH covers with that set up. Also, please work out; weight is no excuse
#3
Quote by MannyC2107
Too many times I hear guitarists complain about weight. Yes, if the ohms match, up it will sound good. There is a guy by the name of Mtuck on YT that does VH covers with that set up. Also, please work out; weight is no excuse


I do work out, but maneuvering it through small corridors and down stairs is a little on the dodgy side, I don't want to bash the combo against the wall and damage the tubes or something. That's why carrying a cab would be easier, they are less fragile.
ESP Horizon NT-II
Schecter Hellraiser C-1
Peavey 6505
Orange PPC412
Maxon OD808
ISP Decimator G-String
Boss TU3
#4
Quote by MannyC2107
Too many times I hear guitarists complain about weight. Yes, if the ohms match, up it will sound good. There is a guy by the name of Mtuck on YT that does VH covers with that set up. Also, please work out; weight is no excuse

Unless you're 7 feet tall and weigh 350 pounds a 4x12 or heavy combo is too heavy for anyone to carry without affecting their health no matter how much they work out
#5
Quote by MannyC2107
Too many times I hear guitarists complain about weight. Yes, if the ohms match, up it will sound good. There is a guy by the name of Mtuck on YT that does VH covers with that set up. Also, please work out; weight is no excuse


This post is ridiculous. Sorry mister tough guy, I'm sure lifting a 90 pound combo is a piece of cake for you...

Weight IS a reason to alter your setup. Big combos and cabs are both heavy and bulky, making them very awkward to carry. Add to this road cases, and your dealing with some serious lift. Most musicians gigging multiple times a week do NOT want to deal with that, and there is nothing wrong with that.

If you're in a high school band and want to lug your MG halfstack to a gig every week, that's fine, but it will get old fast...

The head+212 idea is a fantastic compromise.


Avatar cabs are great for the money, but if you can afford something like a Mesa Recto or Earcandy buzzbomb, the you're going to get much better quality.
#6
Yeah no way can u carry a tube 2x12 alone
im 15 and i have a bugera head a 2x12. Me being a small guy, i even struggle with that

So i build this stand thing with wheels. works awesome i can just wheel it to the car. lifting it into the car is the easy part
And then wack it back on the trolley when i get to practise. easy.
As for avatar cabs. ive head good things about them. never tried them
Gear

Ibanez J custom 8420ZE
Ibanez RGA42
Ibanez RG550
RG3120 Prestige


Framus cobra
#7
Avatar cabs are great... they a solid... use real birch wood (not particle board).. and sound great! You can't honestly get much better than an Avatar because, after all, its just a box with speakers in it.
Gear:

Ibanez RG350DX w/ Seymour Duncans and an OFR
Genz Benz Black Pearl 30 Head
Avatar 212 Cab
MXR Carbon Copy Delay
#9
Quote by denied
^ You can get quite a bit better than Avatar, but for the money they are the best option. Cabs are a little more than boxes.


I'm not arguing with you because I know that there is better than avatar, but I am wondering what physical/construction differences are there between an avatar cab and a higher end one... such as a mesa? What tonal differences are there? Lets say I had a 412 Avatar cab with V30's and a Mesa 412 with V30's.. both open back... what would the difference be?
Gear:

Ibanez RG350DX w/ Seymour Duncans and an OFR
Genz Benz Black Pearl 30 Head
Avatar 212 Cab
MXR Carbon Copy Delay
#10
Quote by Leeav
I'm not arguing with you because I know that there is better than avatar, but I am wondering what physical/construction differences are there between an avatar cab and a higher end one... such as a mesa? What tonal differences are there? Lets say I had a 412 Avatar cab with V30's and a Mesa 412 with V30's.. both open back... what would the difference be?
Mesa uses 70 watt V30's, Avatar use 60 watt V30's. Differences are in the lows, mids and high end freq. However, one is not better than the other.
Mesa uses cabinet grade, birch ply. Avatar uses hardware store, shop grade birch ply. Same stuff you would use to build a dog house. As a result, Mesa cabs are heavier than Avatar's and the lows are stronger and more solid sounding.
Smaller differences are, Mesa use leather riveted corners while Avatar use the basic screwed in metal corners. Mesa also uses a nicer, higher quality jute grille cloth.
MARSHALL JVM 210H
PEAVEY JSX
KRANK 412
MESA 412
FENDER STRATS
DIMARZIO
CELESTION
#11
Quote by Leeav
I'm not arguing with you because I know that there is better than avatar, but I am wondering what physical/construction differences are there between an avatar cab and a higher end one... such as a mesa? What tonal differences are there? Lets say I had a 412 Avatar cab with V30's and a Mesa 412 with V30's.. both open back... what would the difference be?


It has a lot to do with how the cab is put together. Joints, reinforcement, reliability, durability...Cabs need to be solid enough that they will not rattle at high volumes, maintaining volume efficiency. Some cabs have an option for porting, which is essentiall holes that release air, tightening the bass and reducing speaker distortion. Higher end cabs are usually put together so well that they are backed with a lifetime warranty. Get a hold of gumbilicious if you want the technical details, he has a pretty good handle of it.
#12
cabinets are:
1 cabinet
2 speakers
3 wiring
4 design

first off is cabinet, the construction is generally a marine grade baltic birch ply, it is voidless and doesn't resonate(or shake, shaking is bad in that efficiency is lost). cheaper cabs use plywood and press board. mdf is usually to heavy to use with a mobile cab, so it is avoided. older cabs (and some newer) are known to use pine which flex's and has a unique sound. but the modern concept is less resonant wood is preferable because of a more efficient sound transfer so a thick baltic birch ply (~17mm, or ~1/4") is considered premium. most baltic birch comes from a few sources and a few manufacturers and quality is considered fairly flat across the manufacturers from what i hear. basically baltic birch's quality is independent of source and is considered fairly consistent across manufacturers for all intents and purposes.

most cabs use joints to attach the sides of the cabs together. a cab using fasteners(like staples, screws or nails) are considered of lesser quality. most cabs will use finger or dovetail jointing, i don't really see one advantage over another, i hear dovetail is a bit more complicated to do but looks more ornate (but i may be wrong).

second: speakers. these are their own beast themselves. their voicing and components lend themselves to their purposes. matching a speaker for impedance, power handling, response, tone, etc is a personal process. most people start with V30's, and those are pretty good 'beginner' speakers for those who don't know what they want yet. some people like them in the long run, but most will move onto something more specific. examples: g12m-25's for classic rock tone, g12K-100 for metal, alnico blue for boutique low powered amps, etc.

but the points you must consider are the technical, if your head has a 16 ohm out, then get a cab wired for 16 ohms. if it only has 8 ohm, then get an 8 ohm wired cab. also, you must consider power handling. if you have a 50 watt head, then you'll want speaker that handle at least 50 watts total (if you like speaker breakup) or about 75 to 100 watts(if you like a flat response across your volume range and a tighter sound, i recommend this for metal).

third: wiring. this can get complicated, but i'll use a 2x12 for example, cuz it is a bit more simple. you can wire a 2x12 in series or parallel(parallel has extra low end and smooths the signal). you can also wire it for mono or stereo output(or both). these choices have multiple consequences, the easiest is just to wire the whole cab mono for 8 or 16 ohm.

fourth design. this deals with multiple facets previously mentioned, but it is intertwines those with other concerns such as open or closed back design, dimensions, speak number size and orientation. impedance rating is also relevant to applications

all these factors (and many more) contribute to the overall tone of an amp.

edit: that is a canned response i have posted many times, ask any specific questions if you have any?
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
Last edited by gumbilicious at May 30, 2010,
#13
Quote by gumbilicious
cabinets are:
1 cabinet
2 speakers
3 wiring
4 design

first off is cabinet, the construction is generally a marine grade baltic birch ply, it is voidless and doesn't resonate(or shake, shaking is bad in that efficiency is lost). cheaper cabs use plywood and press board. mdf is usually to heavy to use with a mobile cab, so it is avoided. older cabs (and some newer) are known to use pine which flex's and has a unique sound. but the modern concept is less resonant wood is preferable because of a more efficient sound transfer so a thick baltic birch ply (~17mm, or ~1/4") is considered premium. most baltic birch comes from a few sources and a few manufacturers and quality is considered fairly flat across the manufacturers from what i hear. basically baltic birch's quality is independent of source and is considered fairly consistent across manufacturers for all intents and purposes.

most cabs use joints to attach the sides of the cabs together. a cab using fasteners(like staples, screws or nails) are considered of lesser quality. most cabs will use finger or dovetail jointing, i don't really see one advantage over another, i hear dovetail is a bit more complicated to do but looks more ornate (but i may be wrong).

second: speakers. these are their own beast themselves. their voicing and components lend themselves to their purposes. matching a speaker for impedance, power handling, response, tone, etc is a personal process. most people start with V30's, and those are pretty good 'beginner' speakers for those who don't know what they want yet. some people like them in the long run, but most will move onto something more specific. examples: g12m-25's for classic rock tone, g12K-100 for metal, alnico blue for boutique low powered amps, etc.

but the points you must consider are the technical, if your head has a 16 ohm out, then get a cab wired for 16 ohms. if it only has 8 ohm, then get an 8 ohm wired cab. also, you must consider power handling. if you have a 50 watt head, then you'll want speaker that handle at least 50 watts total (if you like speaker breakup) or about 75 to 100 watts(if you like a flat response across your volume range and a tighter sound, i recommend this for metal).

third: wiring. this can get complicated, but i'll use a 2x12 for example, cuz it is a bit more simple. you can wire a 2x12 in series or parallel(parallel has extra low end and smooths the signal). you can also wire it for mono or stereo output(or both). these choices have multiple consequences, the easiest is just to wire the whole cab mono for 8 or 16 ohm.

fourth design. this deals with multiple facets previously mentioned, but it is intertwines those with other concerns such as open or closed back design, dimensions, speak number size and orientation. impedance rating is also relevant to applications

all these factors (and many more) contribute to the overall tone of an amp.

edit: that is a canned response i have posted many times, ask any specific questions if you have any?


+1. Gumbi knows his ish because he's a scientist.

Here's my economic analysis.

An avatar unloaded 212 cab is about 200 + shipping.
A CAA/Bogner unloaded is 475. A StoneAge is 475.
A MillsAcoustic is 629.

The Avatar is good. It will do the trick in 90 percent of the situations you would need a cab for. At 475 you move into premium territory. Most of the cabs at this range are going to be made in the US and generally pretty good.

The Mills...I dunno. That's more then I would spend on a 212 but I hear they are awesome. No one whose owned one has ever said it sucks.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#14
You could buy Avatar, they're inexpensive and sound quite good for the price. However, what people seem to be overlooking here is shipping price. It will cost you almost as much as an Avatar 212 itself just to ship the damn thing to you from their factory. I prefer Mesa cabs over anything, but I'll admit I'm slightly biased. Unfortunately that quality doesn't come cheap either. I'm sure after some more digging, you could find other low-key companies, but Avatar is a solid option aside from shipping.

Edit: Missed post above me... Listen to him, too. Also, @ Gumbi: Dovetail joints are more complicated, but they are EXTREMELY durable. Any company successful enough will have machines that will cut multiple dovetails simultaneously in seconds, more accurately, anyhow.
Standard Strat
Jackson WRMG
Parker DF724

Axe-Fx Standard
Carvin DCM1000L

Mesa Trad. Slant Recto 4x12 (UK V30s)
Custom Horiz. 2x12 (Commonwealth 12s)
Last edited by Karlboy at May 30, 2010,
#15
Quote by AcousticMirror
The Mills...I dunno. That's more then I would spend on a 212 but I hear they are awesome. No one whose owned one has ever said it sucks.

Would you say it sucks if the cab cost you that much cash? Of course not, that would be admitting to a bad investment, and being that 90% of us here are men, that's not an option
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#16
Well... the company says that the cabs are made out of voidless Birch Plywood. My cab seems to be constructed very well and it uses celestion speakers... how would my avatar cab differ from a more expensive cab with the exact same speakers?

Since the wood if voidless... the cab won't vibrate at its fundamental or harmonic frequencies... therefore no energy will be built up in the system. Due to the lack of transfer of energy at these frequencies (resonance), the sympathetic vibration is nonexistent. So... how would the cab be of lesser quality than a 212... marshall cab with the same celestion speakers?

Btw, I went to middle school with you Karlboy.
Gear:

Ibanez RG350DX w/ Seymour Duncans and an OFR
Genz Benz Black Pearl 30 Head
Avatar 212 Cab
MXR Carbon Copy Delay
Last edited by Leeav at May 30, 2010,
#17
well there's a lot of stuff.
The quality of the tolex, the strength of the joints, the quality of the grill, the quality of the baffle, how the baffle is mounted, how the grill is mounted, how the speakers are mounted, the quality of the back panel, how the back panel is mounted, the quality of the center block, how the center block is mounted, the quality of the handles, how the handles are mounted. Little things like that add up.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#18
Quote by Van Noord
Mesa uses 70 watt V30's, Avatar use 60 watt V30's.


WHAT???? lol
Guitars:
Ibanez UV777P
Ibanez RGD2127FX
Ibanez RG3120TW
Ibanez RGD7321
Ibanez RG6003FM
Ibanez SA160
Jackson Slatxmg3-7
Amps:
Baron Custom Amps K88
Rivera Knucklehead TRE
Fryette Sig: X
Randall RM4 /w Modded modules
Cabs:
Mesa 4x12
Bogner 4x12
Peavey 4x12(K85s)
#19
Quote by kylendm
WHAT???? lol

Yup.
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#20
Quote by kylendm
WHAT???? lol


I didn't even catch that. Fact checking fail.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#21
Yeah they definitely are 60watt.
Guitars:
Ibanez UV777P
Ibanez RGD2127FX
Ibanez RG3120TW
Ibanez RGD7321
Ibanez RG6003FM
Ibanez SA160
Jackson Slatxmg3-7
Amps:
Baron Custom Amps K88
Rivera Knucklehead TRE
Fryette Sig: X
Randall RM4 /w Modded modules
Cabs:
Mesa 4x12
Bogner 4x12
Peavey 4x12(K85s)
#22
Err... what? My Mesa 4x12 definitely has the 70w V30s...
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#23
Yo dawg you got an extra 40 watts in yo's.

4x12 Rectifier® Standard
Slant Guitar Cabinet

Performance Features:

240 Watt
V30 Speakers
Closed Back
Wired for Mono or Stereo
8 Ohm Mono / 4 Ohm Stereo
Slant Cabinet
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#24
...porting, casters, edge pieces, piping, jacks, wire. and of course, name brand mark up. just think of fronting money to make a run of 1,000 cabinets.

looks like wood shouldn't cost more than ~50 usd a box. most likely less, depending on design.

http://www.woodnshop.com/hardwood/baltic_birch_plywood.htm

the speakers, you could get a nice pair of weber's 150, and some hardware for under 50. that is a damn good cab for 250, but that is coming close to avatar's price anyway. and you'd need the wood working equipment.
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
#25
The Mesa V30s are different from normal V30s. Mesa is contracted with Celestion to give them V30s that fall into a certain frequency response. They are made the same, they test and pass a certain frequency response requirement to get shipped to Mesa to use in their cabs/amps. Also, the magnet placement is slightly different according to what I've heard.
Last edited by thrasher. at May 30, 2010,
#26
Quote by AcousticMirror
Yo dawg you got an extra 40 watts in yo's.

4x12 Rectifier® Standard
Slant Guitar Cabinet

Performance Features:

240 Watt
V30 Speakers
Closed Back
Wired for Mono or Stereo
8 Ohm Mono / 4 Ohm Stereo
Slant Cabinet

Hmm... wonder when they started putting regular V30s in them then? Mesa has always used specially made 70w ones as long as I've been playing them.

Mine says 280w on the back
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#27
hmm no idea then. I remember maybe mine saying 280 or something? Maybe, no idea. Didn't like them. Hey Mclaw...
uberschall or extacy and why?
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#28
Quote by AcousticMirror
hmm no idea then. I remember maybe mine saying 280 or something? Maybe, no idea. Didn't like them. Hey Mclaw...
uberschall or extacy and why?

I wasn't really impressed at all with the XTC, I think one of the tubes might've been microphonic though cause that thing was super noisy. The cleans were just too ice picky for me, but I've talked to other people and they said that's not the case with theirs... but on all the XTC modelers I've heard - that's exactly how it sounds, so I dunno

Uberschall made me VERY happy though. You MUST use a boost on the gain channel though, otherwise, it's pretty loose and meh haha. But with the boost, it's niiiiiiiiiiiice.
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#30
Oh no.
Guitars:
Ibanez UV777P
Ibanez RGD2127FX
Ibanez RG3120TW
Ibanez RGD7321
Ibanez RG6003FM
Ibanez SA160
Jackson Slatxmg3-7
Amps:
Baron Custom Amps K88
Rivera Knucklehead TRE
Fryette Sig: X
Randall RM4 /w Modded modules
Cabs:
Mesa 4x12
Bogner 4x12
Peavey 4x12(K85s)
#31
When I think about it, even if the cab did rattle, it would reduce the efficiency and therefore useful energy ouput. However, the frequency and overtones are produced by the source (speakers) and the decrease in energy output would just alter the amplitude of the signal (the volume) and not the actual sound or frequencies.
Gear:

Ibanez RG350DX w/ Seymour Duncans and an OFR
Genz Benz Black Pearl 30 Head
Avatar 212 Cab
MXR Carbon Copy Delay
#32
no when a speaker rattles it sounds awful.
I mean you can even tell with avatar right. Between their traditional and their traditional custom...some of that money goes into the nice logo, the nicer grill cloth, and the piping. None of that stuff really affects the sound of a cab at all.

But between my avatar and my top hat there's a definite difference. The wood is thicker, less resonant, the baffle is thicker and sturdier, the speaker mountings are sturdier, the center block is so thick and heavy it could kill a person.

Between an avatar contemporary and an Orange ppc212 closed back...there's a definite difference in feel that you can hear by just knocking the wood, the back panel, the baffle, and all that. Of course the orange tolex, the logo, the piping and all that will cost you as well but that doesn't come with a significant quality increase.

At the end of the day...Orange cabs are a little overpriced in the US I think. However, that doesn't meant that some brands don't offer differences beyond construction. The Bogner/CAA cabs are ported, the Port City 212 OS has a funky internal construction that does something or the other.

That being said...used cabs are so cheap that unless you really need a 212, 412s are cheap as dirt. I just grabbed 1 today for way less then the cost of a new cab from avatar or guitar center and it's loaded with 4 scumbacks.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#33
Look.. I am really not trying to prove that Avatar is the best in the world.. there is far better than avatar! I'm basically looking for a good physics explanation on why some cabs sound better. I know some cabs sound better, but... I am just curious to know what aspects of the construction will change the sound wave. Are there any phyicists on UG?
Gear:

Ibanez RG350DX w/ Seymour Duncans and an OFR
Genz Benz Black Pearl 30 Head
Avatar 212 Cab
MXR Carbon Copy Delay
#34
Quote by Leeav
Look.. I am really not trying to prove that Avatar is the best in the world.. there is far better than avatar! I'm basically looking for a good physics explanation on why some cabs sound better. I know some cabs sound better, but... I am just curious to know what aspects of the construction will change the sound wave. Are there any phyicists on UG?


there are no physicists that play guitar.
Except for Gumbi. I'm sure he can explain it....
but honestly guitar cabs are such stone age technology that no one really knows anymore. People that actually make speakers for theaters and stuff look at guitar cabs like dinosaur fossils.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#35
Quote by AcousticMirror
there are no physicists that play guitar.
Except for Gumbi. I'm sure he can explain it....
but honestly guitar cabs are such stone age technology that no one really knows anymore. People that actually make speakers for theaters and stuff look at guitar cabs like dinosaur fossils.


I disagree. There have been very few advancements in speaker technology. Speakers are very simple. The magnet causes the cone to vibrate at certain frequencies, creating a wave patten. It pushes air. Thats all it does.
Gear:

Ibanez RG350DX w/ Seymour Duncans and an OFR
Genz Benz Black Pearl 30 Head
Avatar 212 Cab
MXR Carbon Copy Delay
#36
^ No.

There have been huge advances in the way live sound is produced. That is like saying a car compresses air and gas, applies a spark, and the car moves. Ye-es technically internal combustion engines have been around since the 1800's, but you would agree that cars have improved in the last 100 or so years, yes?

A speaker cabinet that is not put together solidly will not project sound as efficiently. It will also fall apart under the stress of gigging/touring.
#37
Quote by Leeav
I disagree. There have been very few advancements in speaker technology. Speakers are very simple. The magnet causes the cone to vibrate at certain frequencies, creating a wave patten. It pushes air. Thats all it does.


right.

http://www.martinlogan.com/products/clx25

cones and magnets and stuff. Listen I started this conversation taking you seriously. But, we're gonna need to get back on track if that is to continue.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#38
Okay, thanks for all the input guys, so I guess going with Avatar will be a safe bet for my first cab.

But now for the speakers, I've got absolutely no idea what I should get put in them... I'm leaning towards the V30's since the majority of the bands I listen to use Mesa cabs, which use V30's (notify me if I'm incorrect).
ESP Horizon NT-II
Schecter Hellraiser C-1
Peavey 6505
Orange PPC412
Maxon OD808
ISP Decimator G-String
Boss TU3
#39
Quote by kylendm
Yeah they definitely are 60watt.
Not anymore. Mesa has been using 70 watt V30's for nearly 6 years.
I thought this was common knowledge by now?
MARSHALL JVM 210H
PEAVEY JSX
KRANK 412
MESA 412
FENDER STRATS
DIMARZIO
CELESTION
#40
Quote by Leeav
Look.. I am really not trying to prove that Avatar is the best in the world.. there is far better than avatar! I'm basically looking for a good physics explanation on why some cabs sound better. I know some cabs sound better, but... I am just curious to know what aspects of the construction will change the sound wave. Are there any phyicists on UG?


no physicists, but there is plenty of EE's around here. but if you want the basics...

well it is actually pretty simple. there have been claims were it is more complicated, and i do agree PA and HIFI applications can be complicated, but in the guitar realm you rarely get past a box/speaker setup. from what i can tell in the 'vintage' days, cabinet design was dictated by 'how big does a box have to be to fit 4 speakers in'.

so if a vintage 60's marshall 4x12 sounds good to you, it is probably by accident rather than intention. but if a dr. z ulitmate 2x12 sounds good to you, then design probably plays a big part.

the essential for guitar are a speaker, wiring, and a box. first the signal will be sent to the box via a A/C signal. that signal is then applied to the speaker, the speaker will then respond with it's impedance curve and signal response (lower impedance speakers have a more flat frequency response, in other words the mids, lows and highs will sound more even in volume).

once the speaker starts it's excursion (movement back and forth) you are introducing sound wave propagation. this is very important in that the propagation of the sound is what you are going to judge the speaker off of and that depends on the factors up to this point AND the design of the box. an open box will actually 'scatter' the noise to the front and back of the speaker and will escape the box in both directions (when recording combo's, people will often mic the front and back of the speaker).

a closed back cab will allow the sound to propagate freely from the front but will also 'trap' the sound coming from the back of the speaker and will cause internal reflection in the cab. some of the reflection will actually escape out the front of the cab, while other will bounce around more before 'escaping' the cab. these internal reflection attenuate certain sound wave lengths over others. also, the sealed closed back cab will cause the speaker to move back and forth assymetrically on account of the difference in pressure from the inside of the cab to the outside.

some guitar cabs also have removable backs, mixed open/closed back design, or porting. some people will design their cabs for more or less internal dead air space. also, different materials will resonate at different fundamental and harmonic frequencies. like baltic birch is voidless so it does not 'waste' sound energy by shaking the cab, while pine is known to flex and bend under pressures and will provide a different tone because of that.

there is a number of other factors, like 12" speakers have a 'beaming' quality, in that the sound wave propagates at a fairly small angle (~20 degrees) and you can use 'beam blockers' to disperse the signal more thoroughly.

basically, cab design can be as complex as you want, depending on how much you want to do. you could just use an open back design and forget it. or you could use a ported baltic birch cab with 2 different size speakers in parallel (to help smooth the signal), you could use crossover's for specific wave length reproduction and use beam blockers to disperse the sound. most people just throw speaker in a cab.
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae