#1
I'm not really sure what I should be using more, wrist or elbow for faster strumming, and my strumming technique is fine and relaxed (its mostly rotation and translation).

However, once I approach a certain speed, my elbow stops moving, and its only large wrist motions (translation) that occur, and that's when tension comes in. So I was wondering whether fast strumming should include the arm or mainly wrist.

EDIT: I'm having trouble with a fast strumming section in the middle of YYZ.
Last edited by Timothongz at May 30, 2010,
#2
I use wrist pretty much almost unless it is really slow offbeat things then I just like to swing my arm, but wrist is more comfortable and precise, and after a certain point your elbow will never be able to keep up, and you can train your wrist to almost any speed, (look at those metal guys )

have fun
#3
Quote by kroket666
I use wrist pretty much almost unless it is really slow offbeat things then I just like to swing my arm, but wrist is more comfortable and precise, and after a certain point your elbow will never be able to keep up, and you can train your wrist to almost any speed, (look at those metal guys )

have fun
...That's not entirely true. You can only get to a certain level of speed while using your wrist exclusively

If you're hitting 6-string chords while you're strumming, then yeah > very relaxed and smooth wrist movements are all you need. Lotsa people can strum really fast, but in order to play more intricate strumming patterns without going out of sync (think Al Di Meola) you're definetly gonna have to look up some rhythm picking exercises (if you're dissatisfied with your current playing, that is)

http://youtube.com/watch?v=ZjlXCqPNXVc

Tremolo picking however mainly comes from the forearm (I know a lot of people think of 1-string "flight of the bumblebee"-type shredding, but a lot of rock and metal riffs and chords require tremolo picking as well)...

The trick to nailing that kind of stuff is getting your forearm just a liiitle bit tense. There certainly is some wrist movement, but it's minimal (if you don't keep your wrist semi-relaxed the resistance from the strings will automatically make you cramp up). Your elbow should be your main pivot point (as soon as you start feeling the movement in your shoulders you're doing it wrong) but once again the movement should be very minimal

http://youtube.com/watch?v=WjyBNmqWnN0

It's a bit tough to get it right at first, but once you get the hang of it you'll notice that your speed will go up almost instantly. The more you practice that technique, the longer you'll last (wink wink, nudge nudge...

/] 三方 [\
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Last edited by shwilly at May 30, 2010,
#4
Quote by shwilly
...That's not entirely true. You can only get to a certain level of speed while using your wrist exclusively

If you're hitting 6-string chords while you're strumming, then yeah > very relaxed and smooth wrist movements are all you need. Lotsa people can strum really fast, but in order to play more intricate strumming patterns without going out of sync (think Al Di Meola) you're definetly gonna have to look up some rhythm picking exercises (if you're dissatisfied with your current playing, that is)

http://youtube.com/watch?v=ZjlXCqPNXVc

Tremolo picking however mainly comes from the forearm (I know a lot of people think of 1-string "flight of the bumblebee"-type shredding, but a lot of rock and metal riffs and chords require tremolo picking as well)...

The trick to nailing that kind of stuff is getting your forearm just a liiitle bit tense. There certainly is some wrist movement, but it's minimal (if you don't keep your wrist semi-relaxed the resistance from the strings will automatically make you cramp up). Your elbow should be your main pivot point (as soon as you start feeling the movement in your shoulders you're doing it wrong) but once again the movement should be very minimal

http://youtube.com/watch?v=WjyBNmqWnN0

It's a bit tough to get it right at first, but once you get the hang of it you'll notice that your speed will go up almost instantly. The more you practice that technique, the longer you'll last (wink wink, nudge nudge...


Off-topic, but the forearm tense thing doesn't work at all when it comes to fast single string picking. Yes, you can pick faster but you're ignoring dynamics and its much harder to keep rhythm. If you look at the really great pickers like Paul Gilbert/Shawn Lane its from wrist motion.