#1
I'm in middle of writing a song in G major and would like to use a harmonic minor scale to write the solo. I know I can use the E minor scale (relative Minor) so does that mean I can use the E harmonic minor also, since its just a one note difference. and can i also use a G minor or G harmonic minor? since that's the same key.
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#2
Quote by Slapp62
I'm in middle of writing a song in G major and would like to use a harmonic minor scale to write the solo. I know I can use the E minor scale (relative Minor) so does that mean I can use the E harmonic minor also, since its just a one note difference.
You in fact can't use either. It's in G, not E.

Quote by Slapp62
and can i also use a G minor or G harmonic minor? since that's the same key.
You could, theoretically, but I doubt it would sound any good. Sometimes (as in blues) minor/major mixing sounds really good, but usually it doesn't.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#3
Quote by food1010
You in fact can't use either. It's in G, not E.


this. if you were really dead set on using the harmonic minor scale (although personally, i think the idea of using a scale just for the sake of using it is ridiculous) you could find a way to tonicize E, thereby modulating to the relative minor key. once you're in E minor, you can use E harmonic minor freely.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#4
Quote by AeolianWolf
this. if you were really dead set on using the harmonic minor scale (although personally, i think the idea of using a scale just for the sake of using it is ridiculous) you could find a way to tonicize E, thereby modulating to the relative minor key. once you're in E minor, you can use E harmonic minor freely.
Exactly. This is probably your best bet actually.

TS, what are the chords to your song? It may turn out that it will be very easy for you to transform it into E minor, or simply to modulate in some sections.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#5
The chords that I will probably be playing the solo over are a, g, and c. And isnt the e minor scale the same notes as the g major? Why can't I use it? And if so, what inor scale would I be able to use?
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChemicalFire
You're plugging an interface into an interface...


Interfaception


Pls tell me what is Interfaception. and how to solve.


#6
Quote by Slapp62
The chords that I will probably be playing the solo over are a, g, and c. And isnt the e minor scale the same notes as the g major? Why can't I use it? And if so, what inor scale would I be able to use?
Are those chords all major? Or are they all minor? Or are some of them major and some minor?

I'd almost venture to say that seems more like C major than G major (that is, if all the chords are major, or all but the A at least).

And there's a huge difference between E minor and G major. E minor has E as a root and has a minor quality. G major has G as a root and has a major quality. That's a pretty significant difference.

Basically whenever you play the notes E F# G A B C D in the key of G major (no matter which order you play them in, which you start and end on, etc.), it will 100% always be the G major scale, not the E natural minor scale, as the tonality is already set as G major. In order for those notes to resemble the E natural minor scale, the tonality has to be E minor (well, the quality is irrelevant, but it has to be rooted on E).
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at May 30, 2010,
#7
that riff is all powerchords. sorry i left that out. i only use a, g, and c there but the rest of the song has the f# in it. actually a variation of that riff with f#, e , and b might be used also. again powerchords.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChemicalFire
You're plugging an interface into an interface...


Interfaception


Pls tell me what is Interfaception. and how to solve.


#8
any help at all here....?
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChemicalFire
You're plugging an interface into an interface...


Interfaception


Pls tell me what is Interfaception. and how to solve.


#9
Quote by Slapp62
any help at all here....?


what help do you need?
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#10
what minor scale can i use in my song
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChemicalFire
You're plugging an interface into an interface...


Interfaception


Pls tell me what is Interfaception. and how to solve.


#11
Quote by Slapp62
what minor scale can i use in my song


...none. you're in a major key. you use the major scale. you can try playing a minor scale over it, but it'll sound A) very bluesy, or B) not good at all.

general rule: if you're in G major, you play the G major scale, adding accidentals along the way.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#12
ok thanks..
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChemicalFire
You're plugging an interface into an interface...


Interfaception


Pls tell me what is Interfaception. and how to solve.


#13
But if let's say I was writing a song in a minor scale can I then switch to a harmonic or melodic minor scale
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChemicalFire
You're plugging an interface into an interface...


Interfaception


Pls tell me what is Interfaception. and how to solve.


#14
If you are in a Minor Key or Scale, you use Harmonic Minor over the V7 chord. So, if you play something like (and it's a good idea to show your stuff charted like this):

||: Em | D | C | B7 :||

You would use E Natural Minor for Em, D, and C, then use E Harmonic Minor for B7. Try it, you'll hear it.

The Harmonic Minor scale is use to give us a V-Im harmonically. It's not really got a lot of "melody" in it. So, you use it when you hit, or want to imply, the tension of a V7 chord.
#15
Quote by MikeDodge
If you are in a Minor Key or Scale, you use Harmonic Minor over the V7 chord. So, if you play something like (and it's a good idea to show your stuff charted like this):

||: Em | D | C | B7 :||

You would use E Natural Minor for Em, D, and C, then use E Harmonic Minor for B7. Try it, you'll hear it.

The Harmonic Minor scale is use to give us a V-Im harmonically. It's not really got a lot of "melody" in it. So, you use it when you hit, or want to imply, the tension of a V7 chord.
You can use the harmonic minor scale in places other than the V. Hell, you can play it over any chord that doesn't have the 7 in it (i iio iv bVI) without any immediate discordance.

So TS, just experiment with different things and you'll find out what sounds good to you and what doesn't.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea