#1
What makes a blues progression a blues progression? Mainly I'm looking at Hendrix's I'd like to combine a little metal, rock, and blues because I love them all. So what makes a "bluesy" sound? Besides common 7ths.
#3
You aswered my question easily... How is a diminished fifth or a raised 4th augmented allowed when neither are diatonic to the key your in?
#4
Who or what says they aren't allowed?

Your ear (in other words, YOU).
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#5
Quote by cj_lespaul
You aswered my question easily... How is a diminished fifth or a raised 4th augmented allowed when neither are diatonic to the key your in?


Who said blues were diatonic to a key? The whole point of the blue notes (both the b5 and b3) is to make it bluesy, the chords don't have anything to do with it. The blue notes don't fit in with western music because the blues originated from african music and later on black spirituals. If you've ever listened to someone singing the blues you can tell how their voice goes flat sometimes, the blue notes sort of mimic that on an instrument although in reality the voice isn't really going a half step but more of a quarter step in between the 5 and the b5. That's why you bend to reach those notes most of the times instead of just playing the b5.

In terms of harmony, you can pretty much do whatever you want with it. Minor blues, waltz blues, modal blues, rock blues, jazz blues all might look similar harmonically but their differences are more in the melody and articulations coming from the style. Don't get into substitutions yet until you've mastered it.

Who or what says they aren't allowed?

Your ear (in other words, YOU).





Cop out answers like that from you recently tell me you don't really know the answers to the questions you're responding.
#6
So a substitution meanin accidentals? So I can add these notes in I never knew that... How do I know if the added notes won't clash withthe chords?
#7
The clash is what makes the blues sound, that's the whole point. So go wild.

By substitutions I meant chord substitutions but I don't think you should get on those yet until you master the basic progressions.

Ideally you're given the blues scale which is 1, b3, 4, b5, 5, b7 which is the most basic but you could play chromatically if you knew what you were doing. I normally use a ten note set (everything minus the b2 and b6 although I do use them sometimes as well). The notes don't really matter if you know the feel of the blues idiom, just keep a pool of notes you can pick and choose to play phrases out of. That doesn't necessarily mean you'll use them all but you have the peace of mind that you actually could if you had to.

Knowing that it's that clash that makes it bluesy, blending blues with metal and rock is not really about progressions but more about those clashes with the blue notes. If you want to make something bluesy, in all simplicity all you would have to do is play the blues scale in the key of the song (C blues scale for a song in C major, D blues scale in the key of D minor and so on; whether its minor or major doesnt matter just play the blues scale of the key note). Of course you also have to make it sound bluesy. So I suggest you get a backing track and start working on blues phrasing
#8
Wow you really helped... As for reference, where can I learn substitutions? Did Hendrix use these?
#9
Quote by cj_lespaul
Wow you really helped... As for reference, where can I learn substitutions? Did Hendrix use these?


Jazz theory books, It's really a lot of stuff to cover but just so you get the gist of it:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chord_substitution

The most common sub for the blues is the tritone sub, but the amount of stuff you can do to dominant chords is endless, and considering that pretty much most blues are made up of dominant chords, you're in substitution heaven.

I wouldn't doubt Hendrix used them, but again, I think you should get used to the sound of the basic chords and from there start slowly adding stuff. Chord Substitutions become more common in jazz blues so if you really aren't aiming to play that you should avoid them for now while you get better. Remember that the harmony is taking a back seat to the melody so in the end the melody is what's going to be worth more.
#10
So many questions... So how do I harmonize the blues scale to find progressions and do they have relative keys?
#11
Quote by cj_lespaul
So many questions... So how do I harmonize the blues scale to find progressions and do they have relative keys?


You don't have to harmonize anything. Again the blues is in the melody and the feel in which it is played, any progression works. Why are you trying to complicate yourself?

Just get some basic 12 bar blues backing tracks and if you want to take a look a modified blues just look at a real book, a lot of bebop tunes, especially Charlie Parker's are based on blues modifications. The I/ I/ I/ I/ IV/ IV/ I/ I/ V/ IV/ I/ I/ progression can be felt even if you don't see those chords. The circular form is kept to allow for improvisation.

You really need to play and listen to get the whole thing.
#12
Thank you. Well I'm getting better and I want to know it all. I didn't know to make notes clash and I can play a blues scale in a major/minor key
#13
I'd like to add this in:

The blues scale passing tone was mentioned (the note between the 4 and the 5). Like I mentioned, it's just a passing tone, so it functions as neither a #4 nor a b5, even though it's the same note. This note is sometimes considered one of the blue notes, but that's only when it's not used as a passing tone (like doing a half-step bend up to it) or doing a little 1 b3 4 b5 4 b3 1 riff or something like that.

You can also add the passing tone between the b7 and the 1. It's not really a 7 at all, it's just a passing tone.

That's all I have to say about that. I just felt it was important that you note the difference between passing tones and scalar intervals. They are definitely not the same.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
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